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The Agenda

NRO’s domestic-policy blog, by Reihan Salam.

Gov. Bobby Jindal on Over-the-Counter Birth Control



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Back in March, Virginia Postrel wrote a Bloomberg View column arguing that birth control should be made available over the counter. Ramesh Ponnuru subsequently made the case that conservative Republicans should consider following her lead. I was very pleased to see that Bobby Jindal, the Republican governor of Louisiana, is thinking along similar lines, per a new Wall Street Journal op-ed:

As an unapologetic pro-life Republican, I also believe that every adult (18 years old and over) who wants contraception should be able to purchase it. But anyone who has a religious objection to contraception should not be forced by government health-care edicts to purchase it for others. And parents who believe, as I do, that their teenage children shouldn’t be involved with sex at all do not deserve ridicule.

Let’s ask the question: Why do women have to go see a doctor before they buy birth control? There are two answers. First, because big government says they should, even though requiring a doctor visit to get a drug that research shows is safe helps drive up health-care costs. Second, because big pharmaceutical companies benefit from it. They know that prices would be driven down if the companies had to compete in the marketplace once their contraceptives were sold over the counter.

So at present we have an odd situation. Thanks to President Obama and the pro-choice lobby, women can buy the morning-after pill over the counter without a prescription, but women cannot buy oral contraceptives over the counter unless they have a prescription. Contraception is a personal matter—the government shouldn’t be in the business of banning it or requiring a woman’s employer to keep tabs on her use of it. If an insurance company or those purchasing insurance want to cover birth control, they should be free to do so. If a consumer wants to buy birth control on her own, she should be free to do so.

This strikes me as a very smart way to frame the issue, and it also suggests that the governor has a keen understanding of how large business enterprises use regulatory barriers to protect their economic interests at the expense of consumers.



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