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The White House Fable Factory
Obama peddled lies to win support for O’care, but the true tales of horror are just beginning.

President Obama defends the ACA in a Rose Garden press conference on October 21.

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Michelle Malkin

Now that true horror stories of Obamacare’s wrecking ball are finally reaching the public, the White House doesn’t like “anecdotes.” Live by tale-telling; die by tale-telling.

On Tuesday, White House press secretary Jay Carney huffed that the personal account of Edie Littlefield Sundby, a survivor of stage IV gallbladder cancer survivor, in the Wall Street Journal of seeing her health-insurance plan canceled and her access to doctors cut off was “sensational.” Not a shred of compassion for her predicament. No sorrow for her loss. Must. Attack. Messenger.

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There are millions out there like Sundby who are using Facebook, Twitter, Twitchy.com and a new website called MyCancellation.com to share their plights. White House flacks and hacks are working overtime to “debunk” their experiences, bash insurance companies, and deride individual-market consumers losing their plans as stupid dupes whose stories don’t add up.

Here’s the thing. This Alinsky-steeped administration has relied on an endless stream of sensationalized, phony personal dramas to sell Obamacare. Last month, Organizing for Action (previously Obama for America) promoted the “success story” of Chad Henderson, a supposedly random young person who miraculously enrolled in Obamacare while everyone else in America experienced major tech meltdowns and sticker shock.

Turned out that Lying Chad was actually an OFA volunteer who hadn’t really enrolled in Obamacare yet; he had been “joking.” No matter. Yesterday, Obama appeared before OFA to solicit even more stories from the group to help propagandize Obamacare. A refresher course on the White House Fable Factory’s greatest hits:

Stanley Ann Dunham. Several times over the years, Obama cited his mom’s deathbed fight with her insurer as a reason to support the Obamacare ban on preexisting-condition exclusions by insurers. During a 2008 debate, he shared her plight: “For my mother to die of cancer at the age of 53 and have to spend the last months of her life in the hospital room arguing with insurance companies because they’re saying that this may be a preexisting condition and they don’t have to pay her treatment, there’s something fundamentally wrong about that.” But New York Times reporter Janny Scott discovered that Dunham’s health insurer had in fact reimbursed her medical expenses with nary an objection. The actual coverage dispute centered on a separate disability-insurance policy.

Otto Raddatz. In 2009, Obama publicized the plight of this Illinois cancer patient, who supposedly died after he was dropped from his Fortis/Assurant Health Insurance plan when his insurer discovered an unreported gallstone the patient hadn’t known about. The truth? He got the treatment he needed in 2005 and lived for nearly four more years.

Robin Beaton. Also in 2009, Obama claimed Beaton, a breast-cancer patient, lost her insurance after “she forgot to declare a case of acne.” In fact, she failed to disclose a previous heart condition and did not list her weight accurately, but she had her insurance restored anyway after intense public lobbying.

John Brodniak. A 23-year-old unemployed Oregon sawmill worker, Brodniak saw his health woes spotlighted by New York Times columnist Nicholas Kristof as a textbook argument for Obamacare. Brodniak reportedly was diagnosed with cavernous hemangioma, a neurological condition, and was allegedly turned away by emergency-room doctors. Kristof called the case “monstrous” and decried opponents of the Democrats’ health-care proposals as heartless murderers. The truth? Brodniak not only had coverage through Oregon’s Medicaid program, but he was also a neurology patient at the prestigious Oregon Health and Science University in Portland (a safety-net institution that accepts all Medicaid patients). Kristof never retracted the legend.

Marcelas Owens. An 11-year-old boy from Seattle, Owens took a coveted spot next to the president in March 2010 when Obamacare was signed into law. Marcelas’s 27-year-old mother, Tiffany Owens, died of pulmonary hypertension. The family said the single mother of three lost her job as a fast-food manager and lost her insurance. She died in 2007 after receiving emergency care and treatment throughout her illness. Progressive groups (for whom Marcelas’s relatives worked) dubbed Marcelas an “insurance-abuse survivor.” But there wasn’t a shred of evidence that any insurer had “abused” the boy or his mom. Further, Washington State already offered a plethora of existing government-assistance programs to laid-off and unemployed workers like Marcelas’s mom. The family and its public-relations agents never explained why she didn’t enroll.

Natoma Canfield. The White House made the Ohio cancer patient a poster child for Obamacare in 2010 after she wrote a letter complaining about skyrocketing premiums and the prospect of losing her home. After Obama gave Canfield a shout-out at a health-care rally in Strongsville, Ohio, and promised to control costs, officials at the renowned Cleveland Clinic, which is treating her, made clear that they would “not put a lien on her home” and that she was eligible for a wide variety of state aid and private charity care.

Phony manufactured tales built Obamacare. Real stories of Obamacare wreckage will bring it down.

— Michelle Malkin is the author of Culture of Corruption: Obama and His Team of Tax Cheats, Crooks and Cronies (Regnery, 2010). Her e-mail address is [email protected]. © 2013 Creators.com



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