Google+
Close
Bee Dive
This review stings.


Text  


Sadly, Bee Movie is a forgettable entry in the genre of animated transformations of creatures we normally find irritating into endearing friends of humans.

Advertisement
Co-written and co-produced by comedian Jerry Seinfeld, Bee Movie is the story of Barry B. Benson (voiced by Seinfeld), a recent college graduate who finds mildly appalling the notion that he should now spend the rest of his life mired in a single job in his hive. Barry manages to escape from the hive, befriend a human, and turn the hierarchy of being upside down by bringing a suit against human beings for stealing honey from bees and for hijacking and denigrating bee culture. Evidence for the latter claim? Sting.

The film contains the obligatory clichés about nonconformity, individualism, and the value of all living things. But the film does not take these platitudes all that seriously. There’s a funny line in a courtroom scene about “playing the species card.” The film contains a number of funny scenes but its plot is so flimsy and the dialogue so dependent on audience identification with the actors performing the voices, that it runs out of steam about two-thirds of the way through. Sadly, Bee Movie is a forgettable entry in the genre of animated transformations of creatures we normally find irritating into endearing friends of humans.

In the opening, recent graduates Barry and his buddy Adam (Matthew Broderick) are ushered into Honex Corp. where they are introduced to a variety of occupations. They are admonished to choose carefully because they will hold their jobs for their entire lives. Adam finds this inspiring: “we bees have the most perfectly functioning society on earth.” But Barry is unsettled. He exits the hive by mixing in with the pollen jocks, a group of bee storm troopers sent out of the hive to disseminate pollen.



Text