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Sen. Status Quo
On education reform, Obama talks a great game.


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Thomas Sowell

What about those “real issues” that Barack Obama’s supporters in the media say we should get back to, whenever some new unsavory fact about his past comes out?

Surely education is a real issue, with American school children consistently scoring below those in other countries, and children in minority communities faring worst of all.

What about Senator Obama’s position on this real issue? As with other issues, he has talked one way and acted the opposite way.

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The education situation in Obama’s home base of Chicago is one of the worst in the nation for the children — and one of the best for the unionized teachers.

Fewer than one-third of Chicago’s high-school juniors meet the statewide standards on tests. Only 6 percent of the youngsters who enter Chicago high schools become college graduates by the time they are 25 years old.

The problem is not money: Chicago spends more than $10,000 per student.

Chicago teachers are doing well. A beginning teacher, fresh out of college, earns more than the city’s median income and that can rise to more than $100,000 over the years.

That’s for teaching 6 hours a day, 9 months of the year. Moreover, a teacher’s income is dependent on seniority and other such factors — and in no way dependent on whether their students are actually learning anything.

Obama has said eloquent and lofty words about education, as he has about other things — for example, how it is “unacceptable in a country as wealthy as ours” that some children “are not getting a decent shot at life” because of the failing schools.

In a predominantly black suburb of Chicago, where the average teacher’s salary is $83,000 and one-fourth of the teachers make more than $100,000, Barack Obama noted that the school day ends at 1:30 PM.

In his book, Dreams from My Father, Obama said candidly that black teachers and administrators “defend the status quo with the same skill and vigor as their white counterparts of two decades before.”

It is not a question of Obama’s not knowing. He has demonstrated conclusively that he knows what is going on.

But, for all his eloquent words, he has voted consistently for the teachers’ unions and the status quo.

“I owe those unions,” he has said frankly. “When their leaders call, I do my best to call them back right away. I don’t consider this corrupting in any way.”

Only other politicians’ special interests are called “special interests” by Barack Obama, whose world-class ability to rationalize is his most frightening skill.


Even when he verbally endorses the reform idea of merit pay for teachers, he cleverly re-defines merit so that it will be measured by teachers themselves, rather than by “arbitrary tests.” In other words, Obama placates critics of the educational status quo by being for merit pay in words, while making those words meaningless, so as not to offend the teachers’ unions.



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