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The Trouble with World Opinion
Can you imagine Vladimir Putin or Hu Jintao poring over global opinion polls?


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Mona Charen

Do we care what the world thinks of us? Should we? A new survey of global opinion is getting the usual respectful attention. The Pew Global Attitudes Project surveyed people in 57 countries and found that President Obama’s approval ratings have slipped a bit among Europeans, Latin Americans, and Asians — though he remains quite a bit more popular than George W. Bush was in his final year in office. (President Obama is far better liked abroad than he is at home.)

Liberals tend to care a great deal about the way America is perceived globally and will doubtless be gratified that their pin-up continues to score well in Brussels and Timbuktu. They remind us that Thomas Jefferson himself bowed to a “decent respect for the opinions of mankind” when drafting the Declaration of Independence.

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Jefferson had never attended a session of the United Nations Human Rights Council. On June 18, the Council voted by acclamation to select Miguel D’Escoto Brockmann to serve on its Advisory Committee. D’Escoto, a defrocked priest who served as foreign minister for Nicaragua’s Communist Sandinista government in the 1980s, was fully implicated in that regime’s multiple and grievous human-rights abuses.

This is not D’Escoto’s first high-level posting at the U.N. He served as president of the General Assembly from 2008 to 2009, during which time he warmly embraced Mahmoud Ahmadinejad and described the U.S. invasions of Afghanistan and Iraq as “atrocities that must be condemned and repudiated by all who believe in the rule of law in international relations.” He branded Ronald Reagan as an “international outlaw” and suggested that Israel is “crucifying our Palestinian brothers and sisters.”

Well, perhaps the U.N. Human Rights Council isn’t the best measure of world opinion. Even stipulating that the U.N. represents only the twisted posturing of a largely unelected, corrupt, and cynical collection of thugs, are global opinion polls useful guides to anything? Did you know that 63 percent of Turks, according to one recent survey, approve of polygamy?



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