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Farrakhan Demands Reparations from Jews
His latest anti-Semitic outburst.


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Daniel Pipes

Louis Farrakhan recently sent a three-page letter along with two books to the heads of 16 Jewish organizations.

Dated June 24, 2010, the letter is resplendent with a crescent-and-moon flag and Farrakhan’s impressive-sounding title (“National Representative of the Honorable Elijah Muhammad and the Nation of Islam”). In it, he announces that the books (volume two of The Secret Relationship Between Blacks and Jews and Jews Selling Blacks: Slave Trade by American Jews) present

an undeniable record of Jewish anti-Black behavior, starting with the horror of the trans-Atlantic slave trade, plantation slavery, Jim Crow, sharecropping, the labor movement of the North and South, the unions and the misuse of our people that continues to this very moment.

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Farrakhan challenges the recipients of his letter — who range politically from Jeremy Ben-Ami (of J Street) to Lee Rosenberg (of the American Israel Public Affairs Committee) to Morton Klein (of the Zionist Organization of America) –

to find one act committed by me or those who follow me that has injured one Jewish person, stopped Jews from doing business, hindered their education, injured their families, sullied or desecrated their synagogues.

“You will not find one,” declares Farrakhan, who then asks: “on what basis do you charge me and us as being ‘anti-Semitic’?” Quite the contrary, Farrakhan avers, “we could now charge you with the most vehement anti-Black behavior in the annals of our history in America and the world. We could charge you with being the most deceitful so-called friend, while your history with us shows you have been our worst enemy.” Farrakhan could also dwell on the fact that Jews are “sitting on top of the world in power, with riches and influence, while the masses of my people here in America, in the Caribbean, Central and South America and elsewhere in the world are in the worst condition of any member of the human family.”

He could make these points, he notes, but he chooses not to: “I do not write this with vitriol, hatred, bitterness, or a spirit of vengeance.” Instead, he hopes to establish ties with Jews: “I have pleaded with you over the years for a sensible, intelligent dialogue. You have rejected me.” Despite prior failures, the publication of these two books inspires Farrakhan to try anew: “I again ask you for a dialogue.”

For Farrakhan, “dialogue” equals reparations. Because Jews “are in a position to help me in the civilizing work that The Honorable Elijah Muhammad was given to do by Allah (God).” More specifically: “This is an offer asking you and the gentiles whom you influence to help me in the repair of my people from the damage that has been done by your ancestors to mine.” In other words, after years of unsuccessfully demanding reparations for blacks from the U.S. government, he is now looking to Jews to make amends for their alleged past injustices.



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