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Newtzilla to the Rescue
Gingrich is hard to attack because his weaknesses are already known.


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Jonah Goldberg

‘How do we stop Newt?”

I’ve now been asked that question by a lot of conservatives. It’s not that I’m the go-to guy for that sort of question. Rather, one gets the sense that many “establishment” conservatives are asking everybody that question — in staff meetings, at the chiropodist, even at the McDonald’s drive-thru. (“I’ll have two happy meals, two chocolate milks, and — by the way — do you have any idea how to stop Newt?”)

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The other night while having drinks with some prominent conservatives, I said I thought there was a significant chance that Gingrich will not only win the nomination but that he might be the next president. Going by their expressions, I might as well have said I had put a slow-acting poison in their cocktails. 

Not surprising, then, that there are more knives out for Gingrich than in a Ginsu infomercial. For instance, former New Hampshire governor John Sununu has been nurturing a grievance against Gingrich since he was White House chief of staff in 1990. For two decades he’s been like Inigo Montoya in The Princess Bride. “Hello, my name is John Sununu. You destroyed my boss’s presidency, prepare to die.” Now, with everything at stake, he’s not holding back. 

But Sununu’s barbs bounce off Gingrich, as has George Will’s more brutal rhetorical artillery fire. That’s because conventional weapons are useless against Newtzilla.

First, what are you going to say about the guy that people don’t already know? Just as it’s okay to speak openly about the fact that Darth Vader is Luke Skywalker’s father, Gingrich’s backstory provides no spoilers. Herman Cain was undone because people were still forming their first impressions of him. Everything bad about Gingrich — the flip-flops, the wives, the ego — is known. Once voters have convinced themselves they can overlook that stuff, it’s hard to change their minds simply by repeating it.

Moreover, conservative voters distrust the conservative establishment — variously defined — almost as much as they distrust the liberal establishment. (That’s why David Brooks, the notoriously moderate New York Times columnist, leveled the most vicious charge he could against Gingrich: He touted their similarities!)

Also, Gingrich benefits enormously by being the last obvious “not-Romney” candidate. Michele Bachmann, Rick Perry, and Cain were all well to Gingrich’s right, and many voters assume that Gingrich is being attacked for the same reason that his not-Romney predecessors were.



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