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Predictions

Quarterbacks of the moment — Eli Manning and Tom Brady

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JONATHAN ADLER
On the field, the New England Patriots will avenge their loss in Super Bowl XLII with a convincing win on the backs of their tremendous tight ends. Indy may be Manning Country, but that’s Peyton, not Eli. Off the field, union activists will give the labor movement a self-inflicted black eye insofar as they try to disrupt the festivities to protest Indiana’s new right-to-work law. Activists try to politicize the Super Bowl at their own risk.

Jonathan H. Adler is director of the Center for Business Law & Regulation at the Case Western Reserve University School of Law.


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WILLIAM J. BENNETT
Bill Belichick has a chance to add another Super Bowl win to his already elite coaching career. Tom Brady, 34, can join Montana and Bradshaw with four Super Bowl wins and make an argument for being one of the best quarterbacks ever to play. Also, let’s not forget the revenge factor from 2007, when Belichick, Brady, and the Patriots went into Super Bowl XLII undefeated, but their perfect season came to an end at the hands of . . . the New York Giants. For those reasons, I’m going with the Patriots — and that means one thing: The Giants will probably win.

William J. Bennett is author of The Book of Man


JOSEPH BOTTUM
Have there ever been two teams that were so great, while being so fundamentally flawed? The Patriots have a defense with all the tensile strength of straw. A small, asthmatic wolf could huff and puff it down in an hour, if he really put his back into it. Meanwhile, the Giants have the offense of a small choo-choo train, delusionally panting “I think I can, I think I can,” all the way up the hill.

In other words, this Super Bowl is the clash of the cartoon characters: ridiculous strengths matched with absurd weaknesses. In the event, Brady throws New England to two touchdowns in the first half; Manning grinds the Giants to two field goals and a touchdown in the second half; New England contemptuously adds a field goal, and the Patriots — America’s most annoying team since the Dallas Cowboys were last any good — claim their last Super Bowl of the Tom Brady era, 17 to 13. Boston rejoices. The rest of the NFL goes back to the drawing board.

— Joseph Bottum is the author of The Gospel According to Tim.


SCOTT BROWN
In the last ten years, Boston has won seven major sports championships. On Sunday, the Patriots are going to make it number eight, and I don’t care if it’s by one point or 50.

— Scott Brown is a United States senator from Massachusetts who has a radio ad running this week in this reelection campaign called Patriots.” 


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