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Obama’s Pump Debacle
He can’t admit that high gas prices are his fault — until he’s reelected.


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Jonah Goldberg

On the unaffordable end of the market, things are even worse. Consumer Reports tried to test drive the new $107,850 Fisker Karma, but it couldn’t: “We buy about 80 cars a year, and this is the first time in memory that we have had a car that is undriveable before it has finished our check-in process.”

There’s actually plenty Obama could do to help with gas prices, but he’s right not to do some of them. He shouldn’t release oil from the Strategic Petroleum Reserve, nor should he appease Iran on its nuclear program. But he could, for instance, suspend the Jones Act, which requires that all ships carrying goods between American ports be U.S. flagged. Doing so would dramatically lower the cost to distribute oil and gas (and outrage his union base).

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Obama was recently asked by Fox News’s Ed Henry whether high gas prices are a deliberate result of White House policies. His response was telling. “From a political perspective, do you think the president of the United States going into reelection wants gas prices to go up higher? Is there anybody here who thinks that makes a lot of sense?”

In other words, Obama desperately wants people to think he’s against higher gas prices — at least until he gets reelected.

— Jonah Goldberg is editor-at-large of National Review Online, a visiting fellow at the American Enterprise Institute, and the author of the forthcoming book The Tyranny of Clichés. You can write to him by e-mail at [email protected], or via Twitter @JonahNRO. © 2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc.



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