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Bench Memos

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This Day in Liberal Judicial Activism—July 6



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1989—In solo dissent in Hamblen v. Dugger, Florida justice Rosemary Barkett opines that a capital defendant is not permitted to waive his right to present evidence of mitigating circumstances.  Such waiver, she contends, somehow makes it impossible for the sentencing court to carry out its statutory role of weighing aggravating and mitigating circumstances when deciding whether to impose a death sentence.  But our adversary system routinely depends on the parties to choose what evidence to present.  When no evidence of mitigating circumstances is offered, it simply follows that the mitigating circumstances carry zero weight.

2008—Evidently, Washington Post columnist David S. Broder still doesn’t understand Ronald Reagan or judicial conservatism.  Or maybe he’s just trying to pander to Justice Kennedy.  Recounting Kennedy’s status as Reagan’s third pick to fill the seat of Justice Lewis Powell, Broder claims that the pick “turned out to be successful beyond Reagan’s wildest dreams” and that Kennedy has “fulfill[ed] the expectations that Reagan and others had for him from the start.”


Tags: This Day in Liberal Activism


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