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This Day in Liberal Judicial Activism—March 25



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1993—In her plurality opinion in Wyche v. State, Florida chief justice (and, thanks to President Clinton, current Eleventh Circuit judge) Rosemary Barkett strikes down as facially unconstitutional an ordinance that prohibits loitering for the purpose of prostitution.  Barkett strains to misread the ordinance as not requiring, as an element of the crime, a specific intent to engage in prostitution.  Further, she asserts that even if specific intent were required, the ordinance would still be unconstitutional because of the hypothetical possibility that it could be applied in a manner that would chill First Amendment speech. Never mind that it’s difficult to see how the ordinance would reach any constitutionally protected activity, much less the substantial quantum needed for First Amendment overbreadth doctrine to apply to a facial challenge.

In two other cases that same day (E.L. v. State and Holliday v. City of Tampa), Barkett similarly strikes down as facially unconstitutional ordinances prohibiting loitering for the purpose of engaging in drug-related activity.  So much for the ability of crime-ridden communities to combat the scourges of prostitution and drugs.


Tags: This Day in Liberal Activism


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