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This Week in Liberal Judicial Activism—Week of August 6



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Aug. 6       1993—In a harbinger of nominations to come, President Clinton’s first batch of nominees to the federal courts of appeals seat includes Tennessee supreme court justice, and liberal judicial activist, Martha Craig Daughtrey.  Among other things, as a state supreme court justice, Daughtrey never voted to affirm a death sentence, and she joined an opinion condemning the death penalty (see This Week for Apr. 26, 1987).  In an opinion full of frolics and detours, she extrapolated a state constitutional “right of procreational autonomy” from the provisions of the state constitution that protect freedom of worship, that prohibit unreasonable searches and seizures, that guarantee freedom of speech, and that regulate the quartering of soldiers in homes.  (See This Week for June 1, 1992.)   She also found that the state constitution protects obscenity.  (See This Week for May 17, 1993.)    

Aug. 9       1969—“Now is the time for Helter Skelter,” declares Charles Manson, triggering two nights of vicious killing by the “Manson Family” in Los Angeles.  Some 2½ years later, in its own rampage (see This Week for Feb. 18, 1972), the California supreme court voids the death sentences that had been imposed on Manson and four other Family members. 

 

Aug. 11     2006—Charles Manson, meet Rosemary Barkett.  In a separate opinion in Henyard v. McDonough, Eleventh Circuit judge Barkett, reaching out to address an issue that she concedes (with considerable understatement) “may not be directly before us,” opines that the Eighth Amendment should be construed to bar the death penalty for murderers “with a mental age of less than eighteen years.”  What exactly Barkett means by “mental age” is confused.  At one point, she quotes, with seeming approval, a definition of “mental age” as the “chronological age equivalent of the person’s highest level of mental capacity.”  But she inconsistently equates it with “emotional level” and says that “even high IQ in an adult defendant” is compatible with “a mental age of a child.”  Her test appears to be whether a murderer shares a “child’s inability to understand why the rules exist, to appreciate the consequences of breaking them for herself and for society, and to consistently make judgments based on the foregoing.” 

Barkett’s test virtually ensures that most heinous murderers will be deemed to have a mental age below 18.  Indeed, she states that there is “no dispute” that Richard Henyard—who carjacked a mother and her two daughters (ages 7 and 3), raped and shot the mother, and shot and killed the daughters—has a mental age below 18.

Barkett’s test would seem to establish that she has the mental age of a child.  Does This Week perennial Barkett “understand why the rules exist”?  Does she “appreciate the consequences of breaking them”—through her lawless judicial activism?  Does she “consistently make judgments based” on those understandings?  From the evidence that pervades This Week entries, the answers are no, no, and no.

For an explanation of this recurring feature, see here.


Tags: This Day in Liberal Activism


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