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ABA Committee Member Marna S. Tucker



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Marna S. Tucker, a divorce-law specialist in Washington, D.C., is the D.C. Circuit member on the ABA committee. 

If Tucker were nonpartisan, her selection to serve on the ABA committee would still be indefensible.  As I stated in my Weekly Standard article on what Tucker did to Brett Kavanaugh, “Tucker’s narrow specialty, divorce law, is far removed, in both substance and sophistication, from the work of the federal appellate courts—especially from the complex cases of administrative law that are the staple of the D.C. Circuit.”  There are hundreds, if not thousands, of lawyers in D.C. who have the minimum qualifications that Tucker lacks.  (The D.C. Bar has more than 75,000 members.)  

But Tucker is in fact a fervent left-wing partisan.  Here’s a non-exhaustive list:

 

1.  A strong ally of Hillary Clinton, Tucker has contributed over $4000 to her.  Other beneficiaries of her largesse, which has been directly entirely towards Democrats, have included John Kerry (she gave him the maximum $2000 in 2004); EMILY’s List, the political action committee dedicated to supporting (in its words) “pro-choice Democratic women candidates”; the Democratic National Committee; the 2000 Gore-Lieberman campaign; Teddy Kennedy; Eleanor Holmes Norton; the 1996 Clinton-Gore campaign; the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee; and the 1992 Clinton campaign. 

 

Tucker also gave $1000 to Ralph Neas in support of his 1998 campaign for Congress.  Neas, who heads People for the American Way, has for the past couple decades been a vitriolic opponent of conservative judicial nominees.

 

2.  Tucker is a founding board member of the National Women’s Law Center, which (among other things) actively promotes “reproductive rights” and publicly opposes judicial nominees who are not committed to its agenda.

 

3.  Tucker has been a longtime activist within the ABA on behalf of feminist causes.

 

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