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The Campaign Spot

Election-driven news and views . . . by Jim Geraghty.

Our Favorite Alvin Since That Singing Chipmunk



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Today’s excerpt from the Morning Jolt: The news that we will have Alvin Greene to enjoy for at least a few more months.

The Man with No Campaign Gets the Greene Light

I try to end the week on cheerier notes, and other than a little potential felony with obscene material, is there anything cheerier these days than the surreal saga of Alvin Greene? He has illustrated for us that Democrats see secret plots by Karl Rove in their dreams, and that they’re absolutely incapable of facing unpleasant but plausible truths, like the possibility that in an unpublicized primary, 60 percent of their base goes with the guy whose name reminds them of a soul singer.

What better representation of the dire circumstances of the Obama economy than the tale of Greene, running for Senate because he had no better career opportunities?

Time’s Michael Scherer: “When first asked if he would grant an interview with TIME, Greene responded by asking a question of his own: ‘Does the candidate get paid?’”

You won’t often find me quoting Ann Coulter, but this line is a keeper: “Obama senior adviser David Axelrod said Greene was not a ‘legitimate’ candidate and called his victory ‘a mysterious deal.’ (Yes, how could a young African-American man with strange origins, suspicious funding, shady associations, no experience, no qualifications, and no demonstrable work history come out of nowhere and win an election?)”

The State: “[State Democratic Party Chair Carol] Fowler opened the meeting by telling the S.C. Democratic Party’s executive committee of 63 — which voted 33-7 in to uphold the election results — she tried unsuccessfully to get Greene to sit out the race. ‘I did try to convince him not to run, not because I knew of something in his past but because he seemed so naïve about what it took to run for office.’”

To quote the Godfather, “Who’s being naïve now, Kay?”


Tags: Alvin Greene


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