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The Campaign Spot

Election-driven news and views . . . by Jim Geraghty.

Expect Three to Five Special Elections in the Coming Months



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I periodically joke that there is no off-season in the world of political campaigns. We are likely to see at least four, and perhaps more, special elections in the coming months:

Illinois 2nd Congressional District, where Rep. Jesse Jackson Jr. resigned. A primary will be held February 26 (at this point, no Republicans are running, but eight Democrats have filed papers) and the special general election will be held April 9.

Missouri 8th Congressional District, where Rep. Jo Ann Emerson announced she would resign in February. The date for this special election has not been determined yet; the candidates for Republicans and Democrats will be selected by the party committees.

South Carolina’s 1st Congressional District, where Rep. Tim Scott has been appointed the state’s next U.S. Senator. The special election will be held 18 weeks after Scott’s formal resignation from the House, likely setting the special election for May.

Massachusetts Senate: Presuming that President Obama selects John Kerry as his next Secretary of State, Gov. Deval Patrick would appoint  an interim senator to serve until a special election could be held, most likely in May or June. The interim senator would have the option of running in the special election to fill out the remainder of Kerry’s term, which ends in January 2015.

In Hawaii, the death of Sen. Daniel Inouye means that Gov. Neil Ambercrombie will select a replacement to serve until 2014, when a special election is held (the interim senator may and probably will run in the special election). If Ambercrombie selects Rep. Colleen Hanabusa– reportedly the dying wish of the senator – then Hawaii will hold a special election to fill her seat 60 days after she resigns her House office.)


Tags: Colleen Hanabusa , Daniel Inouye , Jesse Jackson Jr. , Jo Ann Emerson , John Kerry , Tim Scott


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