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The Campaign Spot

Election-driven news and views . . . by Jim Geraghty.

Senator... Affleck?



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This morning, some new names are being mentioned for the various special elections coming up…

In Massachusetts, Jon Keller of the Boston CBS affiliate is floating a fun but unlikely famous name for that state’s upcoming special Senate election: “Believe it or not, one name I have heard tossed around is that of actor-director Ben Affleck, the pride of Cambridge, who’s been active in Democratic Party politics for more than a decade.”

Hey, the director of “Argo” might have a more clear-eyed view on Iran than, say, Chuck Hagel.

Down in Hilton Head, South Carolina, one Republican and one Democrat are making louder noises about running in the special election for the House seat that Tim Scott will be leaving:

State Rep. Andy Patrick, R-Hilton Head Island, and Beaufort County Democratic Party chairman Blaine Lotz expressed interest Monday, as did a handful of other legislators, in the House seat held by Scott, R-Charleston.

Patrick, elected to a second term Nov. 6 in an uncontested race, said he will discuss a run with his wife and pray about his decision.

“Two weeks ago, I never thought about running for higher office and was focused on doing the best I can representing Hilton Head Island and being a father and husband,” said Patrick, who is chief executive officer of Advance Point Global, a security consulting firm.

“But it is something I need to think about and an opportunity worth considering.”

Lotz ran for Congress — when much of Beaufort County was in the 2nd District — in 2008, but was defeated in the Democratic primary by Rob Miller of Lady’s Island, who lost the general election to U.S. Rep. Joe Wilson, R-Springdale.

Finally, in Chicago, one familiar name turned down a bid: “Jonathan Jackson told ABC7 he is not running for the congressional seat vacated by his brother Jesse Jackson Jr. Jackson said he was considering the seat but decided against it.”


Tags: Islam , Ed Gillespie , Jesse Jackson Jr.


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