Ritual Begging and Pleading, This Time With Transformers

by Jim Geraghty

Because no day is complete without asking people to buy my book just one more time…

Today’s Ritual Begging and Pleading, This Time With Transformers

Today’s update on The Weed Agency: My publisher told me some updated pre-order numbers. They’re . . . okay. Not bad. Not that good, though. I’m a bit unnerved because in terms of reaching potential book buyers, you kind folks are the lowest-hanging fruit. You already read me and, hopefully, you already like me. And a healthy number of you already have ordered, paper and e-book versions (about even, interestingly enough) and for that I thank you, and I thank you, and I thank you again.

Unfortunately, this is the part where I beg and plead for you to order a copy for your friends. You see, a week after my book is released, Hillary’s Hard Choices hits the shelves. (The most recent “hard choice” she’s blown was selecting that title.) You know that in the coming weeks, Hillary’s book will be devouring column-inches in the book-review sections, occupying the front tables at the big bookstores, and dominating the cable news airwaves — all the spots that a book like mine needs for exposure.

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Above: the five major pieces of Hillary’s P.R. machine have combined to form a giant robot called “Devastator.”

I see Hillary’s promoting her masterpiece by doing the tough interviews:

Hillary Rodham Clinton hits Chicago for a speech on June 10 — the day her new book “Hard Choices” is released — and at the Chicago Ideas Festival the next day, she will be interviewed by Mayor Rahm Emanuel, who is helping raise money for a group encouraging her to run for president in 2016.

So, she’s got Rahm, the Clinton machine, MSNBC, David Brock and company, and the whole gang helping her out.

I’ve got you.

Can I count on you to help me out? Can we show that there’s an audience out there for a funny little satire that exposes how the bureaucracy-laden federal government is very rarely an effective, efficient, fast-moving tool to solve national problems?

And it’s a pretty cheap way to send that message: $13 cover price, $10.09 on Amazon — don’t ask me why it shifted up a few cents in the past few days — $9.99 on Nook, and as of last night, $7.99 on Kindle. For you Canadians, it’s $9.99 on Kobo.