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The Campaign Spot

Election-driven news and views . . . by Jim Geraghty.

39% of Kentucky Democrats Aren’t Sure Their Own Party Is Better at Handling the Economy



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I’m hearing some left-of-center bloggers say they feel good about the Democratic party’s chances in the Kentucky Senate race, where either Jack Conway or Daniel Mongiardo on the Democratic side will take on either Trey Grayson or Rand Paul on the Republican side.

Well, maybe . . . or maybe not:

Kentucky voters trust Republicans over Democrats on the economy and think last year’s $787 billion economic stimulus package failed, according to the latest Kentucky Poll.

The findings bode poorly for Democratic candidates in the fall congressional elections because poll respondents said the economy and government spending are the two issues most likely to sway their votes…

But in the statewide telephone survey of 600 likely voters this week, 43 percent said the stimulus hurt the economy and 19 percent said it had no effect. Only 13 percent said it helped, while 16 percent said it prevented the economy from getting worse. Nine percent weren’t sure.

Half of Democrats said the stimulus helped the economy or prevented it from getting worse, compared to 8 percent of Republicans and 21 percent of independents.

The poll’s margin of error was plus or minus 4 percentage points. It was conducted May 2 to 4 by Research 2000 of Olney, Md., on behalf of the Herald-Leader and WKYT-TV of Lexington and WAVE-TV in Louisville.

Asked who they trust to do a better job of handling the economy, 46 percent chose Republicans, 35 percent chose Democrats and 19 percent said they weren’t sure. Even among Democrats, 15 percent said they trust Republicans more and 24 percent weren’t sure.

Those numbers could change, of course . . . but not if the state’s unemployment rate remains near its current 10.7 percent.

The Kentucky Poll found Paul and Mongiardo leading their respective primaries.


Tags: Kentucky


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