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The Campaign Spot

Election-driven news and views . . . by Jim Geraghty.

Say, Why Are Donations From ‘Doodad Pro’ Going Through, Anyway?



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Ace makes a fairly shocking discovery:

John Galt of Ayn Rand Lane (zip code: a nonexistent 99999) was able to donate [to Obama's campaign through his web site] with no problem.

Despite the fact that the card holder’s name and address do not match the name he provided.

John McCain’s website? Rejected the same non-matching-information donation.

I guess when you’re gathering up tens of millions from the Saudis and Gazans you have to be a little lenient on matching up credit card donations.

Incidentally– when I [bad word]ing order cheesesteaks from my local deli, I get dinged when I forget my current zip code and give them my old one*.

Again, though: If Obama were demanding that credit card information matched donor information, he couldn’t draw in $150 million largely from fraudulent overseas donors.

Anyone see a pattern? Jennifer Brunner isn’t bothered by “voters” with non-matchable information casting votes; Barack Obama doesn’t take the most basic safeguard of ensuring that a donor’s information matches the information on his credit card.

Try buying something anywhere with a credit card. You check to see if you can get away with entering false information about your name and address.

An automated check bounces all such attempts. Unless this safeguard has been specifically disabled.

And why would anyone do that?

I just can’t think of a single reason.

* Yup. One of our local Texaco stations asks for your zip code to process the purchase, and I used to mix up two of the numbers when I first moved here. Very strange that a candidate’s web site would not have similar safeguards in place.


Tags: Barack Obama , Bill Richardson , Chris Dodd , Fred Thompson , Hillary Clinton , Horserace , Joe Biden , John Edwards , John McCain , Mike Huckabee , Mitt Romney , Newt Gingrich , Rudy Giuliani , Sarah Palin , Something Lighter , Tommy Thompson


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