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Iraq The Model:



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This is from Mohammed, and I’ve found him to be a very good prophet of the Iraqi people’s reaction to events.

The general situation looks frustrating but I have a strong feeling that terrorists and their supporters are way more frustrated. I can only imagine how they feel when they see the endless determination and the bravery Iraqi’s are facing them with; the change in Iraq is moving on and on in a way that doesn’t give the least impression that it can be stopped.

In fact, this continuous, confident political process is gaining momentum from the will of the millions of Iraqis who chose this way and I believe that the next march on October 15 will further empower the process and the next elections will add even more momentum to the change when more millions join the process.

Terrorists will thus need to come up with a reaction that equals and counteracts that of millions of people and that is impossible since their counts are negligible when compared with the Iraqi people.

The democratic process in Iraqi is the knife that can cut the head of terrorism.


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I love this post for two big reasons. First, it puts the terrible events in a real context, the context of daily life in Baghdad. Remember this comes a day after a thousand people died needlessly, after terror attacks on a religious procession and then rumors of suicide attackers. Second, it underlines a point I have tried to make here many times: we keep misunderestimating the Iraqis, who have overperformed. It would have been easy for them to throw up their hands in despair, or vent their righteous indignation on either Coalition forces (the outsiders) or, depending upon which side of the overstated divide we’re talking about, either the Shi’ites or the Sunnis.

But no. They see the big picture and they are going for victory. They want their freedom and they are fighting for it. The Nobel Peace Prize should go to them.



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