Google+
Close

The Corner

The one and only.

Censorship Watch



Text  



Do you remember the row over those cartoons of the prophet Mohammed ran by a Danish newspaper a month or so ago (threats were made, there were complaints by a number of ambassadors, and so on)? Well, now it seems as if the UN (the UN!) might be taking a look. Is the concern the cartoonists’ right to free speech? Well, take a look at this (from the Copenhagen Post) and judge for yourself:

“Daily newspaper Jyllands-Posten’s twelve cartoons of the Muslim prophet Mohammed are causing ripples across the world and worries at the Office of the United Nations’ High Commissioner for Human Rights, Louise Arbour.National daily Berlingske Tidende reported on Wednesday that Arbour had written a letter to the Organisation of Islamic Conferences (OIC), an international organisation of 56 Muslim states, which had complained over the cartoons.In September, Jyllands-Posten called for and printed the cartoons by various Danish illustrators, after reports that artists were refusing to illustrate works about Islam, out of fear of fundamendalist retribution. The newspaper said it printed the cartoons as a test of whether Muslim fundamentalists had begun affecting the freedom of expression in Denmark. Muslims in Denmark and abroad have protested against the newspaper, calling the caricatures blasphemous and a deliberate attempt to provoke and insult their religious sensitivities. Arbour said she understood their concerns.’I would like to emphasise that I deplore any statement or act showing a lack of respect towards other people’s religion,’ she said.Berlingske Tidende reported that it held a copy of the letter, which stated that Arbour had appointed to UN experts in the areas of religious freedom and racism to investigate the matter.’I'm confident that they will take action in an adequate manner,’ Arbour said in her letter to the 56 governments, which have requested the UN to address the issue with Denmark.”

Hat-tip: Brussels Journal




Text  


Sign up for free NRO e-mails today:

Subscribe to National Review