Google+
Close

The Corner

The one and only.

Marshall Meltdown Watch



Text  



Josh Marshall is really cracking up. His latest post in its entirety:

Wipe Out!

McCain crashes and burns in first post post-convention rally without Palin at his side.

I clicked the link, curious to know what happened. Did McCain stumble on policy? Lose his temper? Tell a dirty joke?

No. He had to cut the event short because Obama supporters shouted him down:

PHILADELPHIA – Republican presidential candidate John McCain cut short his first public appearance without running-mate Sarah Palin after chanting supporters of Democratic rival Barack Obama interrupted his speech.

After lunching with a roundtable of women at Philadelphia’s Down Home Diner, McCain shook hands with supporters and strode up to a podium to deliver a statement. But as he spoke, chants of “Obama, Obama, Obama” filled the room.

Reporters craned forward trying to hear the Arizona senator. Unfortunately for McCain — and possibly overlooked by aides who planned the event — a section of the diner opened up to a market where a crowd had gathered behind a cordon.

A large contingent of Obama supporters showed up, mixed with some who had bumper stickers reading “Democrats for McCain”.

“It’s time to leave the talk behind and start shaking up Washington and fixing our economy, taking care of the problems facing our families. We’re going to give a tax cut to every family with a child,” he said.

His words were barely audible.

McCain’s supporters shouted “John McCain”, “John McCain,” “John McCain”. The duelling chants nearly drowned out the presidential hopeful’s voice.

“Pennsylvania is a battleground state as we can tell,” McCain said.

Meanwhile Palin, the Alaska governor, was on a flight back to her state.

That’s it. That’s the whole story. How was any of that McCain’s fault? What did Sarah Palin have to do with it? Maybe I’m missing something. Maybe the winner of the George Polk Award for journalism can explain it to me.



Text  


Sign up for free NRO e-mails today:

Subscribe to National Review