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Threat Level: High



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The economy is in shambles, unemployment is high, al-Qaeda still stalks its desert redoubts, and Congress is ready to focus on the real danger to the Republic: illicit vegetation.

From the Marijuana Policy Project:

The U.S. House of Representatives is expected to pass a resolution today declaring illegal marijuana cultivation on federal lands to be an “unacceptable threat to the safety of law enforcement and the public,” and calling upon the nation’s drug czar “to work in conjunction with Federal and State agencies to develop a comprehensive and coordinated strategy to permanently dismantle Mexican drug trafficking organizations operating on Federal lands.”

Let us think about that for a second: We have murderous Mexican crime syndicates invading our territory and killing our citizens, conducting heinous acts of torture, human trafficking — and operating part of  their enterprises from federal lands. Does any American still trust the federal government to get anything useful done? Somewhere between the WikiLeaks case and the occupation of our federal lands by half-organized gangsters from Sinaloa lies the revelation that the emperor is scantily clad — but instead of learning that lesson, we just put the guys who brought this situation about in charge of our health care. (Congratulations, America!)

Got any bright ideas about how to sideline the Mexican drug cartels? I do. So does one House Democrat:

Speaking on the House floor yesterday, Rep. Jared Polis (D-CO) agreed with the goals of H. Res. 1540, but said the only way to accomplish such objectives would be to eliminate “the failed policy of prohibition with regard to marijuana and replac[e] it with regulation.”

I’m halfway with Mr. Polis there, anyway. (He’s a Democrat, so he probably wants to tax it, too.) Sure would be nice if a Republican not surnamed after an Apostle would step up on this. Dana Rohrabacher, we need you.



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