The Super Bowl

by Daniel Foster

– Game was as good as advertised, and I’m happy for the Packers — a good bunch of guys and a great bunch of fans (not to mention Jets schadenfreude compels me to root against the Steelers).

– I was disappointed Clay Matthews never really put Roethlisberger on his rear end. They seemed to QB-spy him three out of every four plays, which I think was a poor — and nearly disastrous — coaching decision. Sure, Big Ben didn’t break off too many big runs, but he had the time to check down and find receivers time and again.

– Sorry to see a hall-of-famer like Woodson not be able to finish the biggest win of his career.

– Does anybody throw the ball with more velocity than Aaron Rodgers? On a number of attempts, passes were dropped simply because receivers misjudged their speed and couldn’t close their hands around the ball quick enough.

– Everything that wasn’t the football game was pretty uniformly awful. Don’t get me started on the Black-Eyed Peas. After the Janet Jackson fiasco in 2004, the NFL went with classic rock year after year to generally good results (Prince and the Who were probably the weak spots, and even they were pretty good). But the Black-Eyed Peas were a mess. The audio levels were off, the lights on half the “V” in the “LOVE”-shaped stage were out, and the auto-tune (!) was glitchy, which only served to draw attention to why they needed it in the first place. Also, a gratuitous Slash.

– Christina Aguilera has a big voice, but she flubbed the lyrics to “The Star-Spangled Banner.” (Can you spot it?):

– The commercials, I thought, were fairly weak. Budweiser and Bud Light both went 0-fer. The former failed to deliver on a Western-themed ad they’d been running as a cliffhanger for days –

– and the latter stuck to the well-worn territory of soft misogyny, groin humor, and screwing-over-your-friends-to-get-the-last-beer. The usually solid Doritos also did some straight-up weird stuff.

Three that stuck out as good:

(To this day I’ve been known to subtly wave a hand across my body when approaching motion-activated doors at supermarkets)

(Clever use of recession-bred resentment of the wealthy to push cars that MSRP at $115,000)

(Falls under the category of “it’d better be good — we paid for it.”)