The Nature of Community Organizing

by Victor Davis Hanson

Public employees in Wisconsin are paid and pensioned far better than their counterparts in the private sector. The state is facing multi-billion-dollar deficits. The old calculus that employees in the public sector are paid a bit less since they have job security and work for the community at large seems topsy-turvy: Now they are paid more and are fraudulently calling in sick to go on strike, apparently in the belief that lay-offs or higher taxes for others are preferable to themselves paying modest increases for their most generous benefits. In response, the protesters, in the new age of civility, carry signs comparing the governor to Nazis, along with the usual Hitler motifs. And finally, the President of the United States, after running up in his first three years the largest deficits in American history, now weighs in on a local matter — both to chastise the governor for doing the sort of tough cutting the president will not (given that he can print money and Americans do not have the option of fleeing to lower-tax states to avoid increased federal tax “fees”), and to show solidarity with the protesters who are engaging in just the uncivil “get in their face,” “bring a gun to a knife fight,” and “punish” their “enemies” modes of expression that the president in his Tucson speech warned against.