Don’t Cry Over College Grads

by Katrina Trinko

It’s college graduation season! My rant — er, piece — in this morning’s USA Today is a plea that we don’t just greet the new grads with bleakness and despair over their employment outlook, but also remember that they did (hopefully!) gain a great education in the process:

A New York Times article this month rattles off the “bleak” futures awaiting grads: “The chemistry major tending bar. The classics major answering phones. The Italian studies major sweeping aisles at Wal-Mart.” CNN cheerfully headlines a piece, “Fresh out of college, slim hope for a job,” while the Associated Press reports that “not all computer science graduates are going from baristas to programmers. Many are going to jobs at other coffee shops.” …

So it’s no shocker that 57% of Americans have decided that the value-to-cost ratio for college is lousy, according to a Pew Research Center poll out last month. Here’s what should be a surprise: When did the U.S. culture decide that the primary purpose of college was to nab a high-paying job? When did we decide there was no point in getting an education for the sake of, well, learning?

Full article here.