Google+
Close

The Corner

The one and only.

Occupy Wall Street Protesters Hold Moment of Silence Upon Death of Billionaire Capitalist



Text  



I feel bad for the sanitation workers of New York City. Because whenever these hempen malcontents at Occupy Wall Street decide to take their Birkenstocks on down the road, those union guys will be left to try to wash away the patina of patchouli oil, bong resin, and curdled tofu left behind. Now they can add to that heady broth the viscera of a thousand heads exploding from the sheer force of cognitive dissonance:

Suddenly, Wednesday afternoon, the typing stopped — when the world got news of the death of inventor Steve Jobs.

“A ripple of shock went through our crowd,” said Thorin Caristo, who helps lead Occupy Wall Street’s web-based movement.

[. . .]

Jobs’ products are used to generate Wall Street billions, acknowledged Caristo. But there was no irony in mourning, or celebrating, this billionaire while opposing many others who are just as wealthy.

“They had a less positive impact on society than Jobs,” Caristo said. He said this was despite the fact that Jobs was “among the 1 percent” of the country’s population protesters keep citing as having accumulated 40 percent of the wealth.

At 7 p.m. Thursday, Caristo requested a moment of silence from the hundreds of protesters in Jobs’ honor.

[. . .]

Many of the high-tech rebels considered Jobs “a leader, a pioneer,” said Caristo. “He made it easier for humans to communicate, and that’s what we’re doing, sharing our message.”

Jobs was different from those on Wall Street who generate vast fortunes, he said.

“I dislike billionaires with a complete disregard for the future of the human race, to make money,” he said, taking a deep puff from his cigarette as he sat on a stone park wall, with the sun setting over lower Manhattan.

There are billionaires and then, there was “this different, quiet billionaire,” Caristo said. “He was a beneficial member of the human community.”

I suppose it’s a testament to Jobs’ genius as a capitalist that he was able to convince these people he was one of them.



Text