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Gingrich Outlines Differences Between Him and Romney



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In a press conference in New York City today, Newt Gingrich reiterated that he wanted to “run a 50-state strategy” if he was the GOP nominee.

Asked to describe the difference between himself and Mitt Romney, Gingrich cited his Social Security approach, based upon the Chilean model, that allowed people to have personal accounts if they wanted. “Second, I would say the paper we have issued on rebalancing the judicial branch,” Gingrich said, “and the fact that I’m prepared to call for abolishing the office of Judge Barry in San Antonio, because he’s such a bigoted, anti-religious judge who I think violates the American tradition and the American system. I think that’s probably a bolder position than Romney would take.”

Gingrich added that there are “a number of differences” between his policy solutions and Romney’s, including that he wants to abolish the capital-gains tax. He also said, when asked if Romney was a career politician, that Romney had been “running for president for six years.”

He called the fact that his campaign had missed the deadline to be on the Missouri ballot “not a mistake.”

“We have never participated in beauty contests,” Gingrich said. “We didn’t participate at Ames, we didn’t participate in Presidency 5, and the Missouri primary doesn’t have any delegates attached to it. . . . This was a conscious decision, this was not an oversight.”

Nor is the former House speaker worried about Nancy Pelosi’s remarks to Talking Points Memo that “I know a lot about him. I served on the investigative committee that investigated him, four of us locked in a room in an undisclosed location for a year. A thousand pages of his stuff.”

“I want to thank Speaker Pelosi for what I regard as an early Christmas gift,” Gingrich said, before going on to call Pelosi’s efforts a “a fundamental violation of the rules of the House” and to point out that he had been cleared of 83 of the 84 charges against him.



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