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DNC Takes a Pass at Romney’s Bet



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This afternoon, with Mitt Romney in New York City for several fundraisers, the Democratic National Committee tried to take an early strafing run at one of the two leading Republican candidates.

The DNC hired a plane to fly a banner up and down the west side of Manhattan, telling residents on both side of the Hudson, “Bet you 10K Romney’s out of touch,” referring to the $10,000 bet Romney jokingly offered Rick Perry at Saturday’s debate. The banner pointed to a DNC-run website: Mitts10kBet.com.

New York State chairman Jay Jacobs of the Democratic National Committee was present to take questions, most of which centered on the Obama campaign’s views of the Republican primary.

Asked which opponent President Obama hoped to face, Jacobs demurred, but stridently asserted either opponent would be welcome. Declining to discuss their relative strengths, he said that either Romney or Gingrich would be “both great opportunities … to contrast with President Obama’s accomplishments.”

He noted that “first, you’ve got the flip-flopper, Mitt Romney… who hasn’t held any belief for any considerable amount of time.” Jacobs suggested Romney’s bet showed “how wildly out of touch [he is] with Americans’ values and principles.”

Secondly, he described Obama’s other likely opponent, Newt Gingrich, as “so conservative, so far out of the mainstream.” Adding to display of confidence, when asked whether Gingrich’s personal life might come into play in the general election, Jacobs argued, “as Democrats, when you have so much to work with, you don’t need to go there,” but declined to argue that Obama wouldn’t run a negative campaign.

Jacobs also declined to explain how much the plane rental cost, but claimed it was “nowhere near $10,000.”

Romney’s fundraisers began this morning with a breakfast at Cipriani, followed by lunch at the Waldorf-Astoria, and will conclude with dinner at the house of Steve Schwarzman, chairman of Blackstone.



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