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Bon Voyage to the NAACP



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When Mark Steyn has spoken, it is hard to say any more. But the NAACP request that the U.N. Human Rights Council investigate U.S.-voter-ID laws is so ludicrous, it’s impossible to keep silent.

Like the bandit leader in Treasure of the Sierra Madre, NAACP President Ben Jealous apparently believes no one in America should have to show any “stinkin’” ID — at least not for some puerile purpose like authenticating their identity in the polling place. Apparently, ID should be required only for important civic functions — like cashing a check, getting a prescription filled, buying a beer, applying for food stamps, or checking into a hotel. Or for other constitutional rights, including entering federal buildings such as the main headquarters of the Department of Justice in Washington to “petition the Government.”

Unfortunately for Mr. Jealous, the American people overwhelmingly disagree, and understand the importance of putting in place minimal measures such as voter ID to protect the integrity of the election process. And they know that the claims that this is “vote suppression” or “Jim Crow” are laughably ridiculous.  In fact, the latest Rasmussen poll shows that 56 percent oppose the Holder Justice Department’s blocking of the Texas voter-ID law and 72 percent of likely voters think voters should be required to show photo ID.

Still, who can fault NAACP officials for taking a nice, all-expenses-paid trip to beautiful Switzerland, where they can air their complaints before the assembled representatives of Cuba, China, Russia, North Korea, and other paragons of democratic virtue who sit on the Human Rights Council?

By the way, memo to the delegation: You will need a photo ID to get on the airplane. Oh, and a passport (you know, another photo ID) to get into Switzerland and back into the United States.  Bon voyage!

— Hans A. von Spakovsky is a senior legal fellow at The Heritage Foundation and a former commissioner on the FEC.



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