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Securitygate Is Not Going Away



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Securitygate has Nixonian trademarks all over it and is far more injurious to the republic than all the previous Obama administration–era scandals combined. Attorney General Holder simply cannot select an attorney to investigate key players in the administration who was both a recent appointee of Obama and a campaign contributor to and political supporter of him. That too will not stand, and whether now or later, Holder is going to have to wise up, and understand that someone completely outside the administration’s and his own sphere is going to have to adjudicate whether key officials deliberately fed classified information to favored court reporters in expectation that they would massage their resulting narratives to emphasize Obama as a decisive, near-heroic leader during his reelection bid in a tight race.

That the result was lives endangered and national policy imperiled makes an outside investigator essential. Even more chilling is that unlike prior leaking during past administrations when the media was at odds with the executive branch, in this case the administration apparently welcomed the leaks. The reporters involved were assumed to operate, not as self-proclaimed auditors trying to enhance their careers purportedly by keeping government honest, but rather more as court toadies determined to make their sources look good as payback for “exclusives.” I can’t remember a leaking case quite like this one, either in the magnitude of its effects, or the hand-in-glove relationship between leakers and their recipients, or the brazen cynicism of both.

At some point, watch the journalistic community: Typically they rally around the leaky reporter and law breaker as some sort of wounded fawn punished for trying to speak truth to power, but now what? Are they to close ranks with Ministry of Truth careerists who may well have been used as stooges of a government that serially broke the law for partisan advantage?



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