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Priebus: If Election Held Today, Romney Would Win



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In Charlotte, right by the convention center that is the center of activity for the Democrats here, is the NASCAR Hall of Fame. And that’s where the RNC is hunkered down this week, announcing — amid race cars — their plan to counteract the Democrats’ messaging this week.

“Apparently as of today, we are now better off, according to the Democrats, than we were four years ago. The Obama campaign says so, which is a total reversal of their position of yesterday,” RNC chairman Reince Priebus said in a press conference.

“This must mean that 23 million Americans have found jobs,” he added, “incomes have gone up, gas prices are going down, poverty is in decline, and the deficit has been cut, all in the last 24 hours.”

Yesterday, Maryland governor Martin O’Malley said on CBS the United States had not become better off in the past four years. Today, he told CNN the United States was doing better “because we’re now creating jobs rather than losing them.”

Priebus highlighted an Associated Press/GfK poll, which found that 72 percent of Americans saw themselves as doing worse or having the same economic situation as they did four years ago.

He also spoke positively about the state of the race. “I feel real good that if the election were held today, we’d be winning,” Priebus said. “If the election is tied, we’re going to win the election. Independents are not suddenly going to have an epiphany and decide that everything is great, and Barack Obama fulfilled the mission of his presidency, which he did not.”

If the election were held today, he added in response to another question, he was confident that Romney would win Wisconsin, Virginia, Florida, and Iowa. Ohio, Priebus said, was too close to know.

Part of the RNC’s plan includes releasing a daily web video. Today’s focuses on the similarity in the promises Obama made in 2008 to what he’s saying today:



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