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Quitting Planned Parenthood



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In her book Unplanned, Abby Johnson, a former Planned Parenthood clinic director in Texas, recounts how a mandate to get “revenue up” from Planned Parenthood highers-up played into her awakening about what she was a part of.

“Each year,” she writes:

each clinic has an individual budget meeting. With a feeling of dread I drove to Houston to meet with Cheryl and Barbara to receive the budget for my clinic. The assigned budget always includes a line for client goals under abortion services and a line for client goals under family planning.  

When I looked at the numbers, I did a double take. I noticed that the client goals related to family planning hadn’t changed much, but the client goals under abortion services had increased significantly. My mind started racing. Something’s got to be wrong here. Shouldn’t it be the other way around? Our goal at Planned Parenthood is to decrease the number of abortions by decreasing the number of unwanted pregnancies. So why am I being asked, according to this budget, to increase my abortion revenue and thus my abortion client count?  

So I asked the question out loud.  

I came away from that meeting with the clear and distinct understanding that I was to get my priorities straight, that abortion was where my priorities needed to be because that was where the revenue was. This meant that my job as clinic director was to find a way to increase the number of abortions at my clinic.  

To say the least, I was appalled. “Abortion will never be my priority!” I insisted. “Never.”  

Planned Parenthood of South Central New York is joining Johnson. They’re declaring their independence from Planned Parenthood on account of corporate abortion mandates in the new year.#more#

As a local paper reports:

Planned Parenthood of South Central New York is breaking away from the national organization, changing its name and going solo.

In early 2013, the group — which has locations in Binghamton, Norwich, Oneonta, Sidney and Walton — will become Family Planning of South Central New York, an independent nonprofit. . . .

The agency’s local Strategic Planning Committee and Board of Directors unanimously approved independence because the Planned Parenthood Federation of America has mandated that all affiliates provide abortions by 2013. None of the local agency’s offices provide the service; instead, they refer women to nearby abortion providers.

The reason for the split is not a moral objection to abortion. “We remain totally committed to women’s reproductive choice. If we provided abortions, however, we would be duplicating services already provided in our community,” the clinic’s CEO says. “This wasn’t what I’d signed up for,” is how Johnson remembers her reaction to the corporation’s prioritization. She wasn’t a pro-life activist when she recoiled at the abortion mandate, either. She was a woman who got involved with Planned Parenthood because she believed it was a way to “help prevent pregnancies, make abortion rare, and make a difference in the lives of women who need help.” 

Not only will the clinics that make up the current Planned Parenthood of South Central New York not be increasing abortions in upstate New York, but they are providing a valuable public service about the reality of the mission of Planned Parenthood — not quite the heroic life-and-choice preserving mammogram provider it is often advertised as. Knowledge of the reality punctures holes in the public perception and exposes the widespread unquestioned embrace of Planned Parenthood as the poison it is. 



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