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‘Saving Economics from the Economists’



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Over at Coordination Problem, George Mason University’s Peter Boettke comments on a great piece by Nobel economics laureate Ronald Coase in the Harvard Business Review called “Saving Economics from the Economists.” As Boettke rightfully notes, “Ronald Coase — even at 102 years of age — still has that rare gift — simple and clear argument in economic thinking.”

Coase laments what economics has become in the hands of professional economists. He writes:

This separation of economics from the working economy has severely damaged both the business community and the academic discipline. Since economics offers little in the way of practical insight, managers and entrepreneurs depend on their own business acumen, personal judgment, and rules of thumb in making decisions. In times of crisis, when business leaders lose their self-confidence, they often look to political power to fill the void. Government is increasingly seen as the ultimate solution to tough economic problems, from innovation to employment.

Economics thus becomes a convenient instrument the state uses to manage the economy, rather than a tool the public turns to for enlightenment about how the economy operates. But because it is no longer firmly grounded in systematic empirical investigation of the working of the economy, it is hardly up to the task. During most of human history, households and tribes largely lived on their own subsistence economy; their connections to one another and the outside world were tenuous and intermittent. This changed completely with the rise of the commercial society. Today, a modern market economy with its ever-finer division of labor depends on a constantly expanding network of trade. It requires an intricate web of social institutions to coordinate the working of markets and firms across various boundaries. At a time when the modern economy is becoming increasingly institutions-intensive, the reduction of economics to price theory is troubling enough. It is suicidal for the field to slide into a hard science of choice, ignoring the influences of society, history, culture, and politics on the working of the economy.

The whole thing is here. You will also find information about Coase’s Nobel Prize here.



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