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Barack the Blameless, Part III -- Coming Attractions



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In our last episode, we saw our hero deftly employ historical jiu jitsu to blame Republicans for the sequester, only to be cruelly thwarted by the scoundrels Woodward and Baucus.

No matter. Regardless of whose idea the sequester was, our hero’s real plan is to blame Republicans for any and all bad things that befall America and Americans after March 1 — bad things more honestly attributable to administration policies.

Storm clouds wholly unrelated to the sequester have been gathering for months. The economy contracted (or, at best, remained flat) last quarter and the unemployment rate rose to 7.9 percent. The payroll-tax increase will take more than $100 billion out of consumers’ wallets, by itself dwarfing the $44 billion impact of the sequester. The increase in tax rates will also take a sizeable bite out of consumer spending. Moreover, thousands of employers have already begun reducing employees’ hours in order to avoid Obamacare’s penalties.

Despite the fact that these factors and many others will have a more profound impact on the economy and employment levels than the sequester, our hero will blame Republicans alone for failing to avert the sequester; and predictably, with media complicity, he’ll blame Republicans alone for the stagnant economy and miserable employment picture.

Hey, members of the dominant media. Yes, you. You can see this coming from a mile away. Don’t fall for it — more accurately, don’t pretend to fall for it. It’s way too obvious for you not to report what’s going on accurately. You need to — oh, never mind . . .

Months from now the narrative will be that the sequester was the Republicans’ idea, they failed to reasonably “compromise” to avert it, all of the maladies large and small afflicting the country are a direct result of the sequester, and thus, the fault of Republicans. And Barack shall remain Blameless.



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