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Christie: ‘If I Was in the Senate Right Now, I’d Kill Myself’



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Chris Christe, New Jersey’s Republican governor, today blamed all sides for the government shutdown in a meeting with the Philadelphia Inquirer’s editorial board.

When the board asked the governor what he would do if he was a member of the U.S. Senate, Christie answered, “If I was in the Senate right now, I’d kill myself.” He added that situations like these are why he has “never had any interest in being in a legislative body.”

The governor blasted both sides for being well aware of the possibility of a shutdown but failing to avert it.

“The president saw this train coming for a long time. All of a sudden today’s the first day he has anyone over to the White House? Same thing with the speaker, same thing with the majority. They saw this train coming for a long time and did nothing to stop it,” Christie told the board.

Two days ago, Christie visited the Senate and met with a group of leading Republicans, as well New Jersey’s Republican senator Jeff Chiesa, who will serve until the state’s special election next week. At the time he told reporters that he had only been there to visit with Chiesa. However, he opened up about the meeting to the editorial board, saying that he had told his fellow Republicans to “get the government reopened, stop monkeying around, and get back to work.”

“I said, ‘I’m out there in the field, people have no patience for this stuff. None,’” he said.

Christie met with the editorial board after a campaign stop in Palmyra, where he received a pair of Democratic endorsements from the Palmyra Town Council’s presidents. During the event, held in a pizzeria, he hinted at his possible presidential ambitions and dissociated himself from the actors in the shutdown.

“With what we see going on in Washington D.C., right now they could use a dose of some New Jersey common sense,” he said, noting that he did not say “Republican common sense or Democrat common sense.”



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