Re: Brown Students Boo NYPD Commissioner off Stage over Stop-and-Frisk

by Kathryn Jean Lopez

Heather Mac Donald writes

The nauseating combination of ignorance, self-righteousness, entitlement, and boorishness that characterizes campus  politics today was on appalling display yesterday at Brown University, as a massive crowd of students prevented New York Police Commissioner Ray Kelly from addressing the school. Kelly had come to Brown to talk about the New York Police Department’s unmatched success in lowering New York’s crime rate.  The students, however, heckled him off the stage, shouting that Kelly had “institute[ed] systemic racism” in the city through the NYPD’s contested stop, question, and frisk tactics. 

The protesters of course take for granted that they can go about blithely squandering their parents’ tuition money at Brown without fear of getting shot, robbed, or raped.  Nor do they have to navigate through a gauntlet of drug dealers on their way to the store or while picking up their mail.  Residents of New York City’s poorest neighborhoods by contrast endured just such constant fear and disorder until the NYPD embraced proactive policing and other revolutionary reforms in the early 1990s, reforms which Kelly perfected.  When every criminologist predicted that the NYPD’s 1990s crime drop had bottomed out, Kelly drove crime down another 31%, in the process saving another 5000 minority lives. . . .

The Brown protesters disgraced themselves and their school in silencing a selfless public servant who has done more in twelve years for New York’s poorest neighborhoods than decades of the big government redistribution programs that the Brown hecklers most certainly support.  Their behavior represents a failure of civic education and of basic manners, which Brown has apparently failed to correct.  (Brown’s president Christina Paxson rightly denounced the protesters’ silencing of Kelly; too bad there was not adequate security to remove the hecklers before Kelly was so brutishly humiliated.)  If the protesters’ idea of policing takes hold, however, they better figure out a way to stay indefinitely in the safe bubble of their Providence campus.