E-Verify Works

by Mark Krikorian

Being the federal agency with the highest customer satisfaction may be like being the best hockey player in Ecuador. But it’s better than the alternative.

This arrived in today’s e-mail from U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services:

On April 2, 2014, USCIS was awarded the 2014 Annual Government Customer Satisfaction Award by the Federal Consulting Group (FCG) of the U.S. Department of Interior. This award recognizes the E-Verify section of the USCIS.gov website and USCIS.gov español for its responsiveness to customer satisfaction surveys and performance metrics to improve its services. In response to survey feedback, USCIS improved the navigation and content layout of USCIS.gov and increased the speed of adding translated content to USCIS.gov español.

The information isn’t online yet, but in last year’s scores, E-Verify (the free, online system for employers to check whether new hires are lying about who they are) scored way above the federal government average. This is the program open-borders people have been criticizing, first because they said authorized workers would be turned away, and when that didn’t happen, that it would approve too many illegal aliens. There’s no question some illegal aliens succeed in fooling the system, but it’s getting harder and harder for imposters to get away with their lies.

E-Verify is an essential part of any system to control immigration and it’s ready for prime time. Last year the Bureau of Labor Statistics reports there were about 52.8 million hires in Fiscal Year 2013, while USCIS reports 23.9 million E-Verify cases during the same period — meaning that some 45 percent of hires nationwide were screened last year.

If the amnesty crowd wants to build up some credibility, they might get behind making E-Verify a universal part of the hiring process now, without preconditions or trade-offs. Senator Sessions has offered just such an amendment to the unemployment benefits bill, which he spoke about on the Senate floor just last night.