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Carly Fiorina: ‘No More Lectures from the New York Times about the Treatment of Women’



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Former Hewlett-Packard CEO and Republican Senate candidate Carly Fiorina eviscerated New York Times publisher Arthur Ochs Sulzberger Jr. over the firing of executive editor Jill Abramson.

“Here is a woman who [has] been told she has an abrasive style — how many times have women heard that?” Fiorina said Sunday on NBC’s Meet the Press. “She has been a distinguished reporter for the New York Times, an editor for three years. There is not a single word in her departure announcement about her contributions, about her record, about her time at the New York Times. She is  excised from history. No more lectures, please, from The New York Times about the treatment of women.”

Fiorina, who was crushed by Barbara Boxer in a 2010 run for Senate in California, singled out Sulzberger’s statement Saturday blaming Abramson’s mismanagement of the newsroom  for the haphazard and controversial termination.

“Arthur Sulzberger, the more he talks, the more it becomes clear to me that of course she was treated differently. Whatever the issues in the newsroom were, the dynamics around her departure would not have been the same for a man,” she said.

Fiorina also slapped down an attempt to defend the paper by Times Washington bureau chief Carolyn Ryan, who suggested that the abrupt and confusing termination is how Abramson would have wanted it.

“There wasn’t a single positive comment about her in the statement about her departure,” Fiorina said. “Not thank you for your time. Not thank you for a wonderful record of service to the New York Times. Not a word. That is disrespect of the most public form.”

Update: New York Times head of communications Eileen Murphy on Twitter objects that the original press release announcing Abramson’s termination did in fact contain standard thanks-for-your-service boilerplate:


Tags: Jill Abramson , The New York Times , Sunday Shows May 18 2014


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