Google+

The Corner

The one and only.

The Latest Tweets from Team NRO . . .


My Late Reactions to The Speech



Text  



1) To some degree, it wouldn’t have been necessary if the media were giving us better perspective on events in Iraq. (I was on a show with a liberal pundit who said it would be “hard to imagine” how things could be worse there. Hard to imagine? How about if the child prisons were brought back? Would that be worse?) What has worried me even more than the real problems we face in Iraq is the danger that we were headed toward Tet II: a pessimistic perception at odds with the facts on the ground that ended up becoming more important than those facts. The president could have done more to talk about the challenges before us, but it was necessary to talk about the progress. [1a) One silver lining about the assumptions of today's media is you don't need to worry about losing Walter Cronkite any more--you know you've already lost him going in.] 2) Interesting that there wasn’t anything about the WMD question. Doubtless this reflects an accurate political calculation that this question is less important to Americans than improving the security picture in Iraq. 3) It was a very good thing that Bush asked for a large, specific number–$87 billion. If it is part of an intelligent program to win in Iraq, it’s worth every penny. 4) I think the president was quite right to call Iraq the most important front in the war on terrorism today, a point which is true regardless of the wisdom of our initial commitment there.

Fyi



Text  



Check in in the ayem for reax to the Bush address from Ledeen, Robbins, Babbin and more. And, check in for a huge surprise in the morning.

ADVERTISEMENT

Cheerleading Delay



Text  



From a DeLay press release:

House Majority Leader Tom DeLay (R-Texas) tonight responded to President Bush’s address to the nation.
“Tonight the president reaffirmed our resolve: if we are to protect American lives, retreat from Iraq is not an option,” DeLay said. “Winning the peace in Iraq is essential to winning the war on terror. Since 9/11, we’ve been at war for the survival of our nation, and like Ronald Reagan and FDR before him, the president has told the world America’s policy is nothing short of absolute victory.”

Web Briefing: September 22, 2014

“The Real Question Is, Why Are We There in The First Place”



Text  



Wes Clark on FNC right now.

ADVERTISEMENT

Pbs Coverage Spotty



Text  



On my local dial, the Bush speech was on WETA (the largest PBS station), but not on little WHUT at Howard U., and not on Maryland Public Television. This suggests to me that probably only a few major PBS affiliates carried the speech, while many stuck with regular Sunday night programming. That should be compared to the hundreds of PBS affiliates which carried the Democratic debate the other night from Albuquerque.

Here’s The Speech



Text  


Brokaw’s Boiling Over



Text  



Tom Brokaw definitely led the pack in raining on the speech tonight. He led into the address with the number of deaths, and suggested a lot of failure, including the ongoing success of “wily” Yasser Arafat. (?) He came out of the speech suggesting to Biden that given the “profound failure of intelligence, shouldn’t someone be held accountable?” (I read: forced to resign?) He then asked the same question to Barry McCaffrey.

Re: Media Patterns



Text  



I noticed that MSNBC cut immediately to a documentary on al Qaeda. Okay on programming, but not exactly as sign of commitment to news.

Media Patterns



Text  



I’m always interested in how long networks stick with the speech and analysis. CBS and Fox were off the air within two minutes of the President’s conclusion. ABC followed a minute or two later. Since this minimizes the media bias, I suppose we should be happy. But how lame is it to cut back in for the last six minutes of “Without A Trace” as if anyone would find that entertaining?

On a Different Note



Text  



I just opened this email in response to my Hitler/Bush column (I can’t tell if this guy is serious):


Dear Jonah,
I just finished reading your rather long essay defending Bush against the charge of being another Hitler.I agree he is not another Hitler,Hitler was a helluva lot smarter–but that is beside the point.

What I wanted to ask was:Do you think your socks,after a year under the fridge would taste better than Al Sharpton’s? Do you think George Bush’s socks would taste better than Hitler’s after a year under the fridge?I think they would be equally untasty.This should be proof enough of their similarity,never mind their mutual use of fear to motivate their people to go to war and the rest of those idiotic partisan political arguments. Strip them of their socks and you will see that they were true spiritual brothers.
[Name withheld]

McClintock’s Hope



Text  



Peter Robinson observed: “I keep telling myself that, yet I find that somehow I’m unable to extinguish the last little flickering spark of hope that somehow, some way, McClintock might still pull it off.” This reminded me of something I have been thinking about but have heard from no one else. If Arnold turns off the conservative Republican base–as reported–and is viewed by the public as a moderate liberal with an edge, why won’t he end up splitting the Democrat votes (who are the majority party) with Bustamante? In other words, if both Bustamante and Arnold appeal in different ways to the same voters, why should not Bustamante be at least as concerned as McClintock about losing his swing voters? Only in Bustamante’s case, Arnold may threaten even his base voters. This argues for conservatives to damn the torpedoes and sail at full speed ahead on the good ship McClintock.

Perhaps this scenario has been debunked elsewhere. If so, let me know. If not, perhaps others should start exploring it more seriously since it will give heart to Californian Republicans like Peter. Perhaps you heard it here first.

Delusions On Lkl



Text  



Colin Soloway, a Newsweek reporter, just said on Larry King that 1) the U.s. has changed its reasons for war from WMDs to Iraq was part of the war on terror (did people outside the media actually not get that Iraq was part of the war on terror? 2) that there was no terrorism in Iraq until the U.S. got there. One wonders how he would label Saddam Hussein–democratically elected leader? One wonders what he’d consider Salman Pak.

Full Text



Text  


Biden’s Talking Points



Text  



Biden has told NBC and CNN (and lord knows who else before the end of the night) that this speech signals that the president has “finally” broken with the neconservatives and sided with Colin Powell and the United Nations.

Warning!



Text  



Do not get in the way of Joe Biden and a camera tonight. The speech has been over for five minutes and he’s already given interview to CNN and NBC.

Al-Qaeda Zapper



Text  



The president didn’t get into the details on the Washington Post’s piece on the al-Qaeda effort to create an

Frontlines of Freedom



Text  



Yeah, you’re right, Jonah–memorable, right-on phrase. Think it was a good, concise speech. Good reminder that war is still on and the bad guys hate us for the good that we’ve done. Surprising he didn’t talk about 9/11 Iraq connections, just as a reminder, during this week, especially. Doubt the speech was the stuff of changing minds, but he probably brough back in people who were getting war fatigue.

Eighty-Seven Billion



Text  



Personally, I don’t mind the number. I would be far, far, far, far happier if it came with $587 billion in cuts. But, hey, that’s cold-hearted me.

From “The Frontlines of Freedom”



Text  



Great phrase from the president’s speech. Be nice if it was coined a while ago. But still, I think it might stick.

The Speech: I Confess



Text  



I was half expecting a WMD surprise.

Pages

Sign up for free NRO e-mails today:

NRO Polls on LockerDome

Subscribe to National Review