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Recriminations—Beinart



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Peter Beinart is generally smart and reasonable, but was caught out on this one. From his TRB on March 17:

“The administration would like observers to interpret its calm as steely resolve. But it actually signifies a refusal to face reality. The Bush administration says it wants multilateral talks with Pyongyang and a series of other countries, including South Korea, Russia, China, and Japan. The theory behind this approach is that only a united front among North Korea’s neighbors
can exert the pressure necessary to convince Kim Jong Il to turn back. But the
diplomatic reality is that there is no united front. North Korea adamantly
rejects multilateral talks, and South Korea, Russia, and China adamantly
refuse to turn the screws. The Bush administration is paying the price for
having helped fuel the anti-Americanism that elected an ultra-soft-line president in Seoul last December. And it cannot pull out all the diplomatic stops with Moscow and Beijing since its highest priority is convincing those governments not to veto an Iraq resolution at the Security Council. The unhappy result is that the United States is basically facing this crisis alone. Recognizing this diplomatic reality means accepting unconditional, one-on-one talks with Pyongyang.”

Are You Ready?



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Are you ready for some North Korea recriminations? Just can’t get enough from Iraq and want to move on to an entirely different foreign-policy crisis 4,000 miles away? Are you ready? Come on–I can’t hear you! OK, OK, here they come…

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Urgent



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Web Briefing: October 24, 2014

Fab Humility



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Some celebrities, at least, are modest enough to know what they don’t know. Here (via the London Evening Standard) is Paul McCartney on the war in Iraq:
“If Japan bombed Pearl Harbour, it’s clear what you have to do – you have to be at war with Japan,” he said. “But this is a very difficult situation. It’s hard to know what anyone should do. I’m just like anyone else – I’m just watching it unfold…I’m not a politician.”

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Debating Pryor



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Howard Bashman has the latest arguments over judicial nominee Bill Pryor, for and against.

Iraqi Nuclear Scientist Interviewed



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School Shooting



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at a New Orleans high school. One student dead.

More Syria



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Powell: U.S. is considering sanctions against Syria. (NYT)

Syria Update



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Rumsfeld: U.S. has seen chemical weapons tests in Syria over the last 12-15 months. (press conference with Kuwaiti Foreign Minister)

Tikriti Liberation



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From Cnn.Com



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U.S. Army: 11 mobile chemical and biological labs, documents found buried near Karbala.

Oy



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Debate, Debate



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Today, over at frontpagemag, Jonathan Last and I engage in a symposium/debate with two opponents of the war. The questions: Is this a war of liberation? (asked while the war was still in progress) and, What is the significance of the celebrations in Baghdad–especially for the anti-war Left?

Prowler Vs. Gorton



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The American Prowler chastises retired Washington Sen. Slade Gorton for giving the wrong advice to Rep. Jennifer Dunn, who was being pressured by the White House to run against the vulnerable Patty Murray. Gorton said, “Go with your heart.” So Dunn won’t run, and George Nethercutt probably will. Gorton was right to give the advice, and Dunn to follow it. Our nation would be a lot better if American elected officials more often followed their hearts rather than the dictates of party machinery.

Hate Music



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Egyptian folk singer Shabaan Abdul Rahim is looking to follow up on his major international success, last year’s hit “I hate Israel.”
http://www.israelnn.com/news.php3?id=41433
Rahim sang: “I hate the Jews, I hate them. I hate them because they are annoying. All people hate them.” Working on a movie of the same name as the song, Rahim has been rejected by four actresses who were offered the role of leading lady. Despite the cinematic stall, Rahim has a new radio hit, “The Attack on Iraq.” He offers a litany of American/Zionist oppression: “Chechnya! Afghanistan! Palestine! Southern Lebanon! The Golan Heights! And now Iraq, too? And now Iraq, too? It’s too much for people. Shame on you! Enough, enough, enough”

Mecca Movies



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In “solidarity” with (the defeated tyranny in) Iraq, Egyptian film artists are urging a boycott of American films, according to Al Bawaba. Cynics might imagine motives besides pan-Arabism: “the film ‘Gangs of New York’ brought in big profits in Egypt overshadowing local films, making it impossible for fair competition. The film made over five million Egyptian pounds in profit, a matter which forced owners of cinema houses to cancel a number of scheduled screening, since it caused a negative impact on Egyptian films.”

Someone At Harvard Who Gets It



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Another important obstacle to peace between Israel and its neighbors is the United Nations, as Romen Mukamel shows in the Harvard Israel Review. The UN opposed the Camp David Peace Accords between Egypt and Israel. The UN aids resettlement for all refugees around the world, but refuses to assist the resettlement of Palestinian refugees. The UN would not convene a special session to address on-going genocide in Rwanda or former Yugoslavia; instead six of the ten special sessions have involved Israel, on issues as trivial (compared to genocide) as illegal Israeli construction in East Jerusalem.

Syria=Iraq



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Ha’aretz reports that the United States is recognizing Syria’s plan to turn Iraq into the next Lebanon. A better outcome would be to turn Syria into the next Iraq. This would also end the illegal dictatorship in the occupied territories formerly known as Lebanon. The removal of the terrorist regime in Syria would also remove the last pro-terror regime able to ship supplies directly to Palestinian terrorists. With the Palestinian terrorists isolated, the prospect for a genuine peace between Israel and the Palestinians would become a possibility. Just as the best way to “give inspections time to work” was to remove the Saddam regime which was obstructing WMD inspections, the best way to genuine self-government for the Palestinians is to remove the regimes fomenting war in the West Bank and Gaza.

Most Students Are Anti-Preference



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Another Iraqi Assassination?



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