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Critical Condition

NRO’s health-care blog.

The Central-Planning Conceit



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This weekend, House Democrats are planning to pass two health-care bills. One is a sweeping plan that would shift nearly all power over the organization of American health care to Washington, D.C. The other — a full repeal of the “sustainable growth rate” (SGR) formula governing Medicare physician fee payments — is proof positive that the first bill’s strategy of centralized planning is ill-conceived and dangerous to the quality of U.S. medical care.

To understand why, it is worth reviewing how the SGR came to be. In the late 1980s and 1990s, the Medicare bureaucracy set out to reform the way physicians are reimbursed for providing services to the program’s enrollees. The idea was to shift more resources toward generalists, who were then thought to be undercompensated for spending time with patients, and to control overall costs by limiting the growth of aggregate payments to growth in the size of the U.S. economy. After several years of study, lengthy payment regulations were issued, including a predecessor to the SGR formula, which had immediate and profound financial consequences for nearly every practicing physician in the United States.

And so what happened? The exact opposite of what was intended. Instead of encouraging more physicians to enter into primary care, the Medicare physician-fee schedule has rewarded more specialization. The fee schedule only controls prices, not volume. As Medicare’s administrators have tried to hold down costs with fee cuts, specialists increased their share of the pie with more tests and procedures, at the expense of primary-care reimbursement rates. Not surprisingly, the trend of physicians entering specialist practices has accelerated dramatically in the last twenty years. Moreover, overall costs have never been brought under control. With volume soaring, the SGR formula governing annual fee updates has gone completely off the rails. In 2010, fees are supposed to get cut by 21 percent unless Congress overrides it yet again. To secure the AMA’s endorsement of their health-care bill, House leaders are planning to scrap the SGR component of the physician fee system altogether, at a cost of more than $200 billion over a decade.

The irony of the situation seems to be lost on House Democrats: Congress is moving to repeal a prime example of health-care central planning run amok while simultaneously extending federal control to every corner of American health care.

For its part, the Obama administration has been promising for months that it would deliver new and improved central planning to “bend the cost-curve.” The White House Budget Director, Peter Orszag, in a February interview with Politico, suggested that the incoming Obama team was working on groundbreaking ideas that would use the levers of government payment policy to painlessly eliminate inefficiency in American health care. As Orszag put it, “Medicare and Medicaid are big enough to change the way medicine is practiced.”

Now, nine months later, it turns out the Obama administration doesn’t actually have any new ideas of what to do. It is instead proposing to empower an unelected, unaccountable commission to come up with the whiz-bang ideas, which would go into effect automatically without further congressional action. But House Democrats found the commission approach unacceptable, as it would take too much of the central planning power away from them. And so they have instead filled their bill with assorted pilot projects and tests of new Medicare payment approaches. Orszag touts these as good ideas with potential, too. But these ideas would have virtually no impact on federal spending, according to the Congressional Budget Office, and they certainly are not up to the task of offsetting the costs of the massive increase in entitlement spending contemplated in the House leadership bill.

Instead of clever new ideas that painlessly root out waste and inefficiency, the House bill finds savings the same way all central planners ultimately do: with deep and arbitrary across-the-board payment rate cuts. Despite all of the talk of delivery system reform, there’s no real effort to make distinctions based on the quality of patient care. Everyone gets cut the same.

And that’s the real danger of the House bill. There’s no prospect that the federal government will become more nimble overnight at managing the vast and complex health sector in the United States. To control costs in health care, the federal government will do what it always does — it will set prices. In time, that will have the predictable result of driving out willing suppliers of services, leading to queues and access problems. Call it centrally-planned rationing of care.



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