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NRO’s eye on debt and deficits . . . by Kevin D. Williamson.

The Political Economy of Chuck Berry



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1964: “It was a teenage wedding and the old folks wished ’em well / You could see that Pierre did truly love the mademoiselle.”
2012: New York Times: “Families Resigned as Young Americans Put Education, Careers on Hold.” — “The New Face of Poverty.” 

1964: “And now the young monsieur and madame have rung the chapel bell.”
2012: New York Times: “Economic Downturn Brings Backlash against Working Women.” Associated Press: “Child Brides, And Not Just in Afghanistan.”

1964: “C’est la vie say the old folks.”
2012: New York Times: “Elderly Americans in Desperate Need of Additional ESL Funding.”

1964: “It goes to show you never can tell.”
2012: New York Times: “For Elderly, a Time of Uncertainty.”

1964:  “They finished off an apartment with a two-room Roebuck sale.”
2012: New York Times: “With homeownership increasingly out of reach for young Americans, Pierre and his partner were forced to move into a sparsely furnished two-room rental.” — “The New Face of Poverty”

1964: “The Coolerator was jammed with TV dinners and ginger ale.”
2012: New York Times: “With food-stamp funding failing to keep up with soaring need, more young American families are resigned to a diet of cheap, frozen food and sugary soft-drinks. First lady Michelle Obama has declared her nutrition campaign ‘the moral equivalent of war.’” — “The New Face of Hunger.”

1964:  “And when Pierre found work, the little money coming worked out well.”
2012: New York Times: “Young Americans, still feeling the pinch of the Bush recession, are increasingly reliant upon low-wage jobs. ‘Little money is coming,’ says one marginally employed and wretched and basically destitute young man.” — “The New Face of Unemployment.”

1964: “C’est la vie say the old folks.”
2012: New York Times: “A Generation Later, Overlooked Immigrant Community Remains Largely Unassimilated.”

1964: “It goes to show you never can tell.”
2012: New York Times: “Elderly Americans Increasingly Insecure about Prospects.”

1964: “They had a hi-fi phono, boy did they let it blast / Seven hundred little records, all blues, rock, rhythm, and jazz / But when the sun went down, the rapid tempo of the music fell.”
2012: New York Times: “Though spending on consumer goods remained strong, the savings rate remains precariously low, especially among the young.” 

1964: “C’est la vie say the old folks / It goes to show you never can tell.”
2012: New York Times: “Among Elderly Non-English-Speakers, a Sense of Helplessness, Resignation.”

1964: “They bought a souped-up jitney / it was a cherry red ’53.”
2012: New York Times: “Americans Struggle to Keep Up with Car Payments.”

1964: “And drove it down to New Orleans to celebrate their anniversary.”
2012: New York Times: “With family vacations increasingly out of reach, young Americans make do with weekend road trips to nearby cities.” Associated Press: “For one young couple, the year brought a bittersweet anniversary.” — “Families Struggle in an Age of Reduced Expectations.”

1964: “It was there where Pierre was wedded to the lovely mademoiselle.”
2012: New York Times: “Gays Still Denied Marriage Rights in Much of South.”

1964: “C’est la vie say the old folks / It goes to show you never can tell.”
2012: New York Times: “For Struggling Elderly, Future of Social Security Remains Uncertain.” — “The Wrinkly Old Face of Poverty”

1964: “They had a teenage wedding and the old folks wished ’em well / You could see that Pierre did truly love the mademoiselle / And now the young monsieur and madam have rung the chapel bell  / C’est la vie say the old folks, it goes to show you never can tell.”
2012: New York Times: “Rural Americans Caught in a Cycle of Poverty.” — “Poverty: The Familiar Refrain”


Tags: General Shenanigans


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