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Unexpected: Obamacare Premiums Set To Rise in 2015

Via Kaiser Health News:

The Wall Street Journal notes that, as rates for the upcoming season shake out, consumers will make choices between paying higher premiums to stay on their current plans or switching coverage to save cash. Meanwhile, news outlets detail recent reports that analyze these costs, as well as the impact of federal subsidies, and offer regional takes on the rates.

The Wall Street Journal: Premiums Rise At Big Insurers, Fall At Small Rivals Under Health Law
Hundreds of thousands of consumers nationwide who bought insurance plans under the Affordable Care Act will face a choice this fall: swallow higher premiums to stay in their plan, or save money by switching. That is the picture emerging from proposed 2015 insurance rates in the 10 states that have completed their filings, which stretch from Rhode Island to Washington state. In all but one of them, the largest health insurer in the state is proposing to increase premiums between 8.5% and 22.8% for next year, according to a Wall Street Journal review of the filings. That percentage represents the average rate increases for all individual health plans offered by that carrier (Radnofsky, 6/18).

CQ Healthbeat: Premium Increases Forecast in 2015 for Health Law Exchange Plans
Monthly premiums for insurance in the new health law marketplaces will rise in eight of nine states studied in a new analysis released Wednesday by the Avalere Health consulting firm. Oregon was the only state to see a decrease. Average prices there will fall by 1.4 percent, or $3 per month. Among the nine states analyzed, Oregon has the lowest premium filed at $197 per month. Oregon’s average costs are lower, too: The average premium for popular silver-tier plans in 2015 will be $272 per month, compared to $466 per month in Vermont, which has the highest average costs (Adams, 6/19). . .


Who could have predicted this? - Greg Pollowitz


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