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A Well-Known Hipster Defends the Value of Motherhood



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Gavin McInnes has been described as the “godfather of hipsterdom,” but he found himself in hot water with feminists after he made some comments on Huffington Post Live last week. McInnes felt he was emboldening women to feel good about choosing motherhood. But the women on the panel — and subsequently many others — slammed him for trying to force women into traditional roles.

You know the pendulum has swung too far to the left when you say, “There’s nothing wrong with normal” and everyone goes crazy.

…I tried to explain that my motives were benevolent. I live in New York, an elephant’s graveyard for ovaries. From where I sit I see women who put career over family and are now in their 40s, drenched in regret. I cited a study that said women are less happy since feminism took root.

…The quote that generated the most controversy was when I said: I would guess seven percent [of women] like not having kids. They want to be CEOs. They like staying all night at the office, working on a proposal, and all the power to them. But by enforcing that as the norm, you’re pulling these women away from what they naturally want to do, and you’re making them miserable.

Have you ever heard anything less controversial in your life?

…That’s where feminism has brought us. To defend the homemaker and say her life shouldn’t be trivialized is to demean women. Women who put family before career are sellouts in this world. I’m sick of seeing women who follow tens of thousands of years of evolution treated like they’re some kind of freak.

…[A] study I cited says women are less happy after feminism. Maybe the reason for this is that so much of modern feminism forces women to reject the very nature of being female. That’s sexist.

His comments created a maelstrom from radical feminists. They railed against a man who simply believes his wife’s nurturing of their three kids means a heckuva lot more than the commercial ads he has produced. And surprisingly — in this apologist day and age — McInnes did not back down or try to reel any of his comments back in.

 

 

McInnes also stated that he became pro-life after seeing the birth of his first child. Perhaps there in hope in the hipster world after all.

You can read more of what he wrote about his experience here and in an interview with The Daily Caller here. (There is a bit of crude language in both links.)



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