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Buckminster F & LF



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From a reader:

Dear Jonah:  My new copy of  Liberal Fascism only arrived a few days ago and then mysteriously disappeared so that I cannot check the index for the name R. Buckminster Fuller.  If it is not there, it should be.  The Whitney Museum is currently exhibiting a retrospective of his career, including the hilarious “Dymaxion Car”, which is essentially a shopping cart with an engine (and no rear window!).  A good article on the exhibit, by Withold Rybcynski, appeared today on Slate.  Fuller’s concoctions embody all the Fascist elements of the International Style of Gropius and others, but without the style.  This is to say that they are directed toward the packaging of human beings in what amounts to architectural egg-crates.  The summa of his achievement is of course the hideous “geodesic” dome.  In the mid-sixties, I attended an invited lecture that he gave a the University of Colorado where, at the time, I was a research associate.  The nascient counter-culture was in full cry at the time and “Bucky” was one of its heroes.  His lecture was a disconnected jumble of incoherent remarks.  Afterwards, he was surrounded by a bevy of accolytes wishing to engage him with their questions.  He blew them off by telling them, in my hearing, that nothing they might say was of the slightest interest to him.


On another topic, it may be of some interest to you that your book has penetrated the innermost redoubt of the New York contemporary art world.  My son, from whom I received my copy, is a well known New York painter who himself was a victim of a Whitney retrospective in 2003.  He was most profoundly moved by the book which lifted the scales from his eyes and revealed, in all its horror the true nature of the world in which he lives and works.  In his words, speaking of his associates, “They would put us in jail if they had the power.”.  Of course, we may only speak of this in whispers, since he has been flying under the political radar of the art establishment for years.


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