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The WSJ vs PolitiFact



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PolitiFact recently named the phrase “a government takeover of health care” as it’s “lie of the year.” The editors of the WSJ respond:

So the watchdog news outfit called PolitiFact has decided that its “lie of the year” is the phrase “a government takeover of health care.” Ordinarily, lies need verbs and we’d leave the media criticism to others, but the White House has decided that PolitiFact’s writ should be heard across the land and those words forever banished to describe ObamaCare.

“We have concluded it is inaccurate to call the plan a government takeover,” the editors of PolitiFact announce portentously. “‘Government takeover’ conjures a European approach where the government owns the hospitals and the doctors are public employees,” whereas ObamaCare “is, at its heart, a system that relies on private companies and the free market.” PolitiFact makes it sound as if ObamaCare were drawn up by President Friedrich Hayek, with amendments from House Speaker Ayn Rand.

This purported debunking persuaded Stephanie Cutter, a special assistant to the President. If “opponents of reform haven’t been shy about making claims that are at odds with the facts,” she wrote on the White House blog, “one piece of misinformation always stood out: the bogus claim . . .” We’ll spare you the rest.

PolitiFact’s decree is part of a larger journalistic trend that seeks to recast all political debates as matters of lies, misinformation and “facts,” rather than differences of world view or principles. PolitiFact wants to define for everyone else what qualifies as a “fact,” though in political debates the facts are often legitimately in dispute.

The rest here.



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