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Granholm Calls Voter ID “Suppression” and “Treasonous”



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Current TV host and former Michigan governor Jennifer Granholm writes at HuffPo:

In November, five million eligible voters will find it harder to exercise their rights in America — 150 voter suppression laws have been introduced in 30 state legislatures across the country.

The most common tactics: requiring photo ID, restricting registration drives, limiting early voting and imposing onerous residency requirements. Who do these laws most directly affect? The poor, the elderly, minorities and the young. And how do those groups typically vote? Democratic.

What she calls “treasonous,” I call the Canadian model of voter identification. From the Elections Canada website:

I’m homeless. How do I vote?

Eligible electors who are homeless or have no fixed address are welcome to register and vote.

Everyone who votes must prove their identity and address. This page lists all the types of proof of identity and address accepted at the polls.

Here are some of the ways you can prove your identity and address at the polls:

  • To prove your identity (name), you can show a piece of ID with your name on it, like a fishing license, library card, social insurance card (SIN card), birth certificate or Veterans Affairs Canada Health Identification Card.
  • To prove your address, you can show an official letter called an “Attestation of Residence.” If you have gone to a shelter for food or lodging, you can ask the shelter administrator for this letter.
  •  If you don’t have documents to prove your identity and address, you can take an oath and get someone you know to vouch for you. That person has to be an eligible elector in the same polling division as you, and he or she must show authorized documents that prove his or her identity and address.

For more information, please contact Elections Canada at 1-800-463-6868.

Are these Canadian rules treasonous, too?



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