Google+

Tags: Between the Covers

Between the Covers

John McWhorter on All About the Beat



Text  



John McWhorter, author of All about the Beat: Why Hip-Hop Can’t Save Black America, says a lot of smart people actually believe rap and hip-hop are “going to teach young black America to rise up against the oppressor.” McWhorter explains for John J. Miller why this is nonsense.

Kathleen Parker on Save the Males



Text  



Kathleen Parker, author of Save the Males: Why Men Matter; Why Women Should Care, describes for John J. Miller a disturbing shift in Western society: “The culture has become decidedly anti-male. … We have turned against men and maledom in general.”

Mark Bowden on The Best Game Ever



Text  



Mark Bowden, author of The Best Game Ever: Giants vs. Colts, 1958, and the Birth of the Modern NFL, sets the scene for John J. Miller: “Arguably one the best defenses in the league, the New York Giants in 1958, plays the best offense in the league, which was the Baltimore Colts, to a tie, and then they have to battle it out in overtime.”

Steven M. Gillon on The Pact



Text  



Steven M. Gillon, author of The Pact: Bill Clinton, Newt Gingrich, and the Rivalry that Defined a Generation, tells John J. Miller that “the pact” hinged on a single meeting where “these two dominant figures of the decade actually came together and talked about forming a partnership to push Social Security and Medicare reform through Congress.”

Ralph Reed on Dark Horse



Text  



Dark Horse: A Political Thriller is the first novel for Ralph Reed, the seasoned political insider. Reed explains the timely premise for John J. Miller: “It’s about the most bizarre presidential election in American history . . . I won’t ruin the story, but it’s a bitter fight — not unlike the one between Clinton and Obama.”

Peter Schweizer on Makers and Takers



Text  



Peter Schweizer’s Makers and Takers tallies the many ways in which conservatives are superior to liberals. For instance, Schweizer tells John J. Miller that “liberals are much more accepting of cheating on their taxes, are much more accepting of cheating on their spouse, [and are] much more likely to take money that doesn’t belong to [them].” The list goes on and on.

Jason Riley on Let Them In: The Case for Open Borders



Text  



Jason Riley, author of Let Them In: The Case for Open Borders, tells John J. Miller that many of the arguments for a stricter U.S. immigration policy are counterintuitive. For instance, Riley describes how the U.S. border “should be opened further as a means of reducing illegal immigration.”

Iain Murray on The Really Inconvenient Truths



Text  



Iain Murray, author of The Really Inconvenient Truths: Seven Environmental Catastrophes Liberals Don’t Want You to Know About — Because They Helped Cause Them, explains for John J. Miller why misinformation is so rife in the environmental movement: “they take a germ of truth and then blow it up out of all proportion; they take a mole hill and they make a mountain.”

Richard Brookhiser on George Washington on Leadership



Text  



Richard Brookhiser, NR senior editor and author, most recently, of George Washington on Leadership, describes for John J. Miller the many qualities that made the father of our country such an exceptional leader. Among these was physical stature. Says Brookhiser, “When he does show up [before his troops], he makes an impressive figure. And that sort of momentary first impression is a very important thing.”

Mark Bauerlein on The Dumbest Generation



Text  



Mark Bauerlein, author of The Dumbest Generation: How the Digital Age Stupefies Young Americans and Jeopardizes Our Future, describes his subject for John J. Miller: “They were on Google doing research from the time they were in fourth or fifth grade.” And why are they dumb? “They have all these [technological] privileges, and they use them on adolescent trivia.”

Michael Ward on Planet Narnia



Text  



Michael Ward, author of Planet Narnia: The Seven Heavens in the Imagination of C. S. Lewis, explains for John J. Miller how Lewis “structured the seven Chronicles of Narnia around the seven heavens of the Medieval cosmos. . . . When you look at the evidence, it really works out.”

Chip Mellor on The Dirty Dozen



Text  



William “Chip” Mellor, co-author with Robert Levy of The Dirty Dozen: How Twelve Supreme Court Cases Radically Expanded Government and Eroded Freedom, tells John J. Miller that the twelve cases chosen “each play a critical and tragic roll in effectively amending the Constitution, to take away what the Founding Fathers intended.”

James Mullaney on The New Destroyer: Dead Reckoning



Text  



The New Destroyer: Dead Reckoning, is the latest in a series of adventure novels by James Mullaney and Warren Murphy. Mullaney describes the setting for John J. Miller: “the twentieth highjacker from 9/11 . . . has somehow smuggled into his prison cell a weapon of great destructive power. . . . Following his escape from prison all hell breaks loose, and everybody is after this weapon.”

Mary Lefkowitz on History Lesson



Text  



In History Lesson: A Race Odyssey, classics professor Mary Lefkowitz describes how she spoke out against professors who taught that Greek culture “was stolen from Africa and that Jews were responsible for the slave trade.” She tells John J. Miller, “We really just need to try and talk about history as if it had some relationship to evidence.”

Michael Connelly on The Blue Religion



Text  



Michael Connelly, editor of The Blue Religion: New Stories about Cops, Criminals, and the Chase, explains for John J. Miller that “if you do not walk in the cop’s shoes it’s hard to understand” what it’s like to be a cop. Thus, to be a cop is to be part of “a cult, a blue cult,” or a “blue religion.”

Arthur Herman on Gandhi & Churchill



Text  



Arthur Herman, author most recently of Gandhi & Churchill: The Epic Rivalry that Destroyed an Empire and Forged Our Age, tells John J. Miller that despite the great differences between his subjects, “they are really very much alike. And they really provide for us, I think, two very contrasting models of how democratic leadership can work in the modern age and the post-modern age.”

Ursula K. Le Guin on Lavinia



Text  



Novelist Ursula K. Le Guin describes for John J. Miller her latest effort, Lavinia. Who is Lavinia? In Virgil’s Aeneid, she is the second wife of Aeneas, and is barely mentioned. But Le Guin says, “Because Aeneas struck me as almost more of a novel character than an epic hero, a story began to go in my mind . . . What happens after the Aeneid ends, when they do get married?”

Arthur Brooks on Gross National Happiness



Text  



Arthur Brooks, author of Gross National Happiness: Why Happiness Matters for America–and How We Can Get More of It, offers John J. Miller a revelation: “People who call themselves conservative or very conservative are about twice as likely to say they are very happy people, as are those who say they are liberal or very liberal.”

Richard A. Posner on How Judges Think



Text  



Richard A. Posner, who sits on the U.S. Court of Appeals, has a unique insight into the topic of his book, How Judges Think. He tells John J. Miller that thinking like a judge is a lot different than, say, thinking like an umpire, where it’s three strikes you’re out: “The problem with the courts, in especially the United States, is that the rules are often extremely fuzzy.”

Andrew C. McCarthy on Willful Blindness



Text  



Andrew C. McCarthy, NRO regular and author of Willful Blindness: A Memoir of the Jihad, tells John J. Miller that “the theory of the book is that the war actually started with the bombing of the World Trade Center in 1993. . . . Everything we’ve been arguing about from 9/11 forward really is a repetition . . . of the same arguments we were having in the wake of that [earlier] event.”

Pages

Sign up for free NRO e-mails today:

Subscribe to National Review