Google+
Close

Phi Beta Cons

The Right take on higher education.

Home-Grown Terrorism



Text  



Walid Phares, senior fellow at the Foundation for the Defense of Democracies, and recent winner of a Bradley Prize, said on Oprah some time ago that our chief problem with Islamic terror in the future will come from American-born Muslims who become radicalized at mosques. He might have added Islamic schools as a source of radicalization, where students are taught that Islamic theocracy is the highest form of government. Although we say we are a nation built on an idea, no one really checks to see if the idea is being taught and transmitted. And he might have added as yet another source of Islamic radicalization our college campuses, where students may imbibe any amount of anti-American, anti-Israel, anti-Semitic propaganda, and may grow to hate the society they grew up in. We already have one example in Mohammed Taheri-Azar, the Chapel Hill student who has been living in the U.S. since age two and was educated here, who tried to kill fellow students by running them down with an SUV. The note he left clearly lays out his fury at America. An excerpt follows. The whole thing was published online on March 24, 2006, at heraldsun.com, but the link no longer seems to be working. (The number 19 has some special cryptic significance in the Koran.)

Due to the killing of believing men and women under the direction of the United States government, I have decided to take advantage of my presence on United States soil … to take the lives of as many Americans and American sympathizers as I can in order to punish the United States for their immoral actions around the world. In the Qur’an, Allah states that the believing men and women have permission to murder anyone responsible for the killing of other believing men and women. I know that the Qur’an is a legitimate and authoritative holy scripture since it is completely validated by modern science and also mathematically encoded with the number 19.



Text  


Sign up for free NRO e-mails today:

Subscribe to National Review